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  1. #1
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    splicing regular-8

    i'm still waiting for my first-ever roll of regular-8 to come back from processing. In the meantime I bought a editor-viewer, that came with a bunch of tape splices for super-8. Since I can't use the tape for 8mm I will need to buy either some tape or some cement. Which is better, taping or cementing? Do I need any equipment for cementing? I have heard that film cement is nothing but acetone, is that true?

    And the big question: How do you do cement splices? I read the directions that came with the super-8 tape splices I bought, and it looks like you butt the two pieces of film against each other and tape both sides. But surely cement splices aren't butt-splices? There isn't enough room between frames to overlap the two ends, so do you scrape the emulsion off a whole frame, and lap it with the base of the other end?
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #2
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    cementing is better. You scrape off some emulsion, a half frame or something. You need a cement splicer, but the bonds are permanent and the transitions seamless. The cementing process uses a solvent to melt the two strips of film together.

    You can buy the cement from B&H photo.

  3. #3
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Do you really need a cement splicer? What does one look like?

    I heard elsewhere that you could make cement out of acetone with some shredded film dissolved in it to make it gap-filling.
    f/22 and be there.

  4. #4
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    You do need a cement slicer. I suppose it's possible to do by hand but not practical. They'll line everything up for you. Simple.

    You can try making your own if you've heard that works. Personally, if you're buying the splicer you may as well buy the cement. It seems like a gamble. You choice though.

  5. #5
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    FWIW I can only extrapolate from pro 16mm and 35mm practice.

    Hot (well warm) cement splicing always requires loss of a frame or frames forever. Tape splicing makes butt joins which do not require any loss and can be unspliced and remade if you have a change of heart (of which there are very many in a cutting room)

    Usually an editor cuts a work print, tape splices it, the negative cutter then matches the final cut work print and hot cement splices the master.

    Cement splices are regarded as archival, tape splices will--even using the best tape available--eventually ooze adhesive which will transfer itself to the layer on top etc and wreak whatever havoc it can.

    I'm not sure whether 8mm splicers with heating elements are made, I'd suggest just leaving the join to dry a little longer if the splicer is not heated (the element in pro splicers supplies only a gentle heat)

    It was heartbreaking for me to find the condition of some irreplaceable footage which the TV network had tape spliced because it was easier at the time.

    Regards - Ross

  6. #6
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    This Bolex splicer is great and perhaps the best made for regular-8 editing. It scrapes the film to 1/2 thickness at the overlap and, if you don't get any bubbles in the glue, the only visual defect is a fine line through one frame. Its not heated so you have to wait a little before you open it up after each splice. I use Kodak film cement. I have also used Acetone but sometimes it can evaporate quicker than you can close the splicer.

    Last edited by ic-racer; 05-27-2009 at 09:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Also, for playing regular 8, look into one of these. Again, perhaps the best regular-8 projector ever made. Its all cast and machined aluminum. A very precision item.

  8. #8
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Yeah, the projector I have is a Kodak brownie 500, and I don't even think you can adjust its running speed.
    f/22 and be there.

  9. #9
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    Nitrate film is spliced with a cement that consists basically of amyl acetate as solvent with acetone added and other chemicals.

    Acetate film is spliced with cement basically mixed from acetone, acetic acid and other components.

    PETP polyester film is spliced either hot (welded) or cold and dry (pressure sensitive or self adhesive tape).

    Most cements for acetate film contain dioxane, methyl chloride, and more harmful chemicals. If you wish to work with a harmless product, try PARATAX. That is a slow binding cement. It stinks of vinegar but is not poisonous. Sold by this company: www.filmkunst.ch

  10. #10
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I got my film back from the lab, and it works. I definitely need editing capabilities though because I ruined about half of it through accidental exposure to room light. I can't find regular 8mm tape anywhere on the web.

    This projector is terrible...I have to hold my finger against the upper spool or it will backlash everywhere, the auto-threading doesn't really work, about half the times I try to use it the image is jumpy, and the top spool randomly falls off.
    f/22 and be there.

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