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  1. #11

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    I'm not steve but I can answer that question just as well. I've managed to get good shots at 1/30, so long as the subject(s) are still. Sometimes 1/15, but the blur gets noticable at bigger enlargements.

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I am Steve but to be honest, I have not experimented with slow shutter speeds. 1/125 is the speed I use for about 90% of my shots.

    I occasionally go down to 1/60 or even 1/30 with my Rolleicord but nothing too slow.


    Steve.

  3. #13

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    One thing you should not do is over-tightning your mussels, it makes them vibrate.
    The more relaxed, both in body, mind and breathing the better.

    Weight training: if you are the move all day with a RB or Linhof Master Techika that training is included.

    Otherwise a monopod will help to stabilize the camera together with spread legs.

    Peter

  4. #14

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    No extra strength is needed as long as you can carry your camera. Its all about finding the proper posture.

    You can lower the effect of muscle vibration by bringing your posture to a point where you can feel your ligaments bending.
    The rest is about breath control. Do not hold your breath, just slow it down.

  5. #15
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    I've done some competitive shooting (rifle) and you do hold your breath, but just momentarily to squeeze off the shot. Inhaling and exhaling expands/contracts lungs and transfers movement to weapon via your arms or shoulders. I would think the same thing can happen with a camera. I've always held mine for an instant when tripping the shutter if the camera is hand held.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  6. #16
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I've had the best luck with not holding the camera tightly at all...rather cradling it as gently as possible such that the inertia of the camera itself is the dominant factor. This works especially well with big cameras. This depends on the camera but most of them will fire shake-free if you dangle them from a string and use the timer. Also my wife with her very petite hands has no trouble shooting my heavier cameras at low speeds. From this I conclude that it's the human factor, mostly the shutter release, that's causing the shake. But then again, I have injured wrists, and gripping tightly will induce a shake in my hands. It plays hell with my shooting; I have to use a rather weak grip and skateboard tape on the grip because gripping firmly will cause shakes to start.
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #17
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I undertook a strenuous year long session of drinking beer each day, now I can rest the camera on my belly.

  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post
    It is not about strength, but more about breath control and a smooth release of the shutter, not a jab.
    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    I've done some competitive shooting (rifle) and you do hold your breath, but just momentarily to squeeze off the shot. Inhaling and exhaling expands/contracts lungs and transfers movement to weapon via your arms or shoulders. I would think the same thing can happen with a camera. I've always held mine for an instant when tripping the shutter if the camera is hand held.
    What they said.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I undertook a strenuous year long session of drinking beer each day, now I can rest the camera on my belly.
    What he said rather than what they said. Sounds a lot more fun

    pentaxuser

  10. #20
    Akki14's Avatar
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    I was quite pleased with my recent indoor colour shots I took with my Yashica-A as they were about 1-2 seconds long without a tripod with no hint of jiggle I've not even been weight lifting lately!
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

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