Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,928   Posts: 1,585,197   Online: 752
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,553
    Images
    65
    One of my friends has a prism lens that goes on his Nikon cameras and creates 2 frames on one frame of 35mm or 2 frames on one digital sensor capture. He scans his negative, which is a stereo pair and has software that produces a polarized image on his HDTV. Wearing standard polarizing glasses, he sees the stereo picture in vivid detail. He also has software to make digital prints from his film stereo pairs which he can put into an old stereo viewer to give beautiful color photos in a format popular about 100 years ago.

    PE

  2. #12
    reellis67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,887
    Images
    13
    PE,

    I have one of those too - for my film EOS camera. They do a nice job, but mine at least has a closer inter-ocular separation than my Realist camera, so it doesn't work well for close-ups. Loreo makes a macro stereo lens attachment that looks really interesting, but I'm a little skint right now, so no macro stereo for me :P

    I can, and regularly do, make Holmes format stereographs from the prints, and they look really neat. It's a snap to do, even by hand, but cutting the neat looking curve at the top that Keystone used is a bit tricky. There's something really rewarding about sitting down to look at your own stereographs...

    - Randy

  3. #13
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,553
    Images
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by reellis67 View Post
    PE,

    I have one of those too - for my film EOS camera. They do a nice job, but mine at least has a closer inter-ocular separation than my Realist camera, so it doesn't work well for close-ups. Loreo makes a macro stereo lens attachment that looks really interesting, but I'm a little skint right now, so no macro stereo for me :P

    I can, and regularly do, make Holmes format stereographs from the prints, and they look really neat. It's a snap to do, even by hand, but cutting the neat looking curve at the top that Keystone used is a bit tricky. There's something really rewarding about sitting down to look at your own stereographs...

    - Randy
    Randy;

    There is a double exposure method that was in the Kodak Stereo handbook which shows how to take closeups in stereo by moving the camera to simulate the correct intra-ocular distance. My friend has a jig on his tripod for that, as well as for extremely large intra-ocular distance for special shots.

    PE

  4. #14
    reellis67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,887
    Images
    13
    Yep, I've got a slide-bar, made by Manfroto for macro work, that I mounted sideways on the tripod head. I pasted a small scale on there marked with focus distances so I can slide it the 'optimal' inter-ocular distance for a subject that far away. It works well so long as there is no wind It works well for far away subjects too, if you have a longer slide bar.

    - Randy

  5. #15
    Neanderman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ohio River Valley
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    575
    Quote Originally Posted by reellis67 View Post
    Aligning two projectors is not easy, but it can be done.
    Nonsense. For 13 years my job entailed aligning anywhere from 2 to 32 projectors. And, yes, we did some 3-D shows. The real problem is not projector alignment, but slide registration. We used pin-registered cameras and slide mounts, but neither of those are absolutely required.

    The easiest way to align two projectors is to set one above the other. Just build yourself a shelf that straddles one projector and set the second one on it.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  6. #16
    Neanderman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ohio River Valley
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    575
    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    Is it correct to say the lenticular screen will not work?
    No. A lenticular screen is exactly what you want.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  7. #17
    reellis67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,887
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Neanderman View Post
    Nonsense. For 13 years my job entailed aligning anywhere from 2 to 32 projectors. And, yes, we did some 3-D shows. The real problem is not projector alignment, but slide registration. We used pin-registered cameras and slide mounts, but neither of those are absolutely required.

    The easiest way to align two projectors is to set one above the other. Just build yourself a shelf that straddles one projector and set the second one on it.

    Ed
    I appreciate your point of view, but mis-registered images cause eye strain in most viewers. Stereoscopic projection may be a snap for someone with 13 years of experience, but for a beginner it can be a bit more challenging. Stacking projectors is the standard method for non-stereo projection units though, and as long as you understand what you are doing it can be done easily enough, but I would not want to view a long series of images on projectors setup by someone who had never done it before.

    The original poster stated that he was trying this for the first time using images made with a non-stereo camera, which means that there is going to be rather a lot of work needed to get each slide displayed properly to minimize eye strain, and the setup is likely to need adjusting for each pair. Certainly it can be done, and I think that the OP should give it a shot, but I'm not convinced that my point of view is nonsense...

    - Randy

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin