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  1. #21
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyno View Post
    I'm going to be doing an overnight (or two nights) in the Victorian Alps with a friend of mine from APUG and I'll be taking my 8x10 Tachihara, Manfrotto 075 tripod with 3 way head, 10 film holders, light meter, filters, plus a sleeping bag, food and a small tent. All up about 35-40 kg. Nowe who's mad?
    Mike
    Who's mad!?
    Well, son, I feel something is very, very wrong somewhere. But if you enjoy it (and more importantly can haul it!), we mere mortals salute you!

    EDIT: Mount Feathertop on 17-18th October (I'm in so far), or something else????
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    Remember - If your camping gear weighs more than the camera kit, either pick a lighter tent or get a bigger camera :o
    I love it.

  3. #23
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    Hello, I chose the fm with a 28 and a 50 prime (and a ricoh gr-d II). My wonderful girlfriend surprised me by taking a minolta hi-matic GF I didn't new she had. I shot tmax, she shot reala expired in '96. Should be some swell prints!

  4. #24

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    I went on a day walk with Poisson du jour (Gary Higgins) and SMBooth (Shane) on Sunday to the Otway Ranges here in Victoria. There had been 40 mils of rain the day before, so it was quite wet. I took the 8x10 tqchihara and holders and Manfrotto 075 tripod, about 30+ kg. Gary took a digi pic of me just before we started out. I have attached it for your enjoyment. Ignore the pained look on my face, I was just imagining what I was going to feel like after we got back from our 6 k hike.
    Mike


    http://users.ncable.net.au/~higgins1.../IMG_2552.html

  5. #25
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    I'm not a landscape photographer, but I do recall that when I was in the military many years ago I learned that it had been accepted since the middle ages that the maximum a infantryman could carry for a days march, and still be fit for combat is about 60 Lb, I always bear this in mind before I load my camera bags.
    Ben

  6. #26

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    I like to walk, but if I 'm going to bring a lotta stuff I usually bring my mule!

    Jeff

  7. #27

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    Consider taking no camera at all. I've never been into the wild and taken a picture that was anything but a disappointment compared to actually being there. Furthermore, if you want to show your friends any of your images they will only be interested in the ones with people in them and capturing a portrait in the backcountry that pleases you is almost impossible compared to what you might think while setting in an armchair at home.

    Most pleasing landscape photography is done by people traveling directly to the site (usually by car), at the perfect time of day and year, with the perfect weather and without the time constraints imposed by a backpacking trip. Backpacking and landscape photography are equal avocation, and are best practiced separately, in my opinion. If anything, take a P&S with fill flash for group shots.

    Denis K

  8. #28
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis K View Post
    Consider taking no camera at all. I've never been into the wild and taken a picture that was anything but a disappointment compared to actually being there. Furthermore, if you want to show your friends any of your images they will only be interested in the ones with people in them and capturing a portrait in the backcountry that pleases you is almost impossible compared to what you might think while setting in an armchair at home.

    Most pleasing landscape photography is done by people traveling directly to the site (usually by car), at the perfect time of day and year, with the perfect weather and without the time constraints imposed by a backpacking trip. Backpacking and landscape photography are equal avocation, and are best practiced separately, in my opinion. If anything, take a P&S with fill flash for group shots.

    Denis K
    Actually that so close to the mark its not funny, bushwalking is bushwalking, photography trip is photography. But thats not to say you don't/cannot get some great images.

  9. #29
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis K View Post
    Consider taking no camera at all. I've never been into the wild and taken a picture that was anything but a disappointment compared to actually being there. Furthermore, if you want to show your friends any of your images they will only be interested in the ones with people in them and capturing a portrait in the backcountry that pleases you is almost impossible compared to what you might think while setting in an armchair at home.

    Most pleasing landscape photography is done by people traveling directly to the site (usually by car), at the perfect time of day and year, with the perfect weather and without the time constraints imposed by a backpacking trip. Backpacking and landscape photography are equal avocation, and are best practiced separately, in my opinion. If anything, take a P&S with fill flash for group shots.

    Denis K
    _____________________________

    Oh dear. That's hardly funny, amusing or correct, what you have actually written suggests a lack of skill, discipline, drive, enthusiasm and the capacity to blend two enjoyable pasttimes. Backpacking and photography go together, not separately, and the best places can only be reached by going quite literally off the beaten track—on foot (of course a car is used to transport you to the start). Bushwalkers have been doing this since Nelson lost an eye! The original OP had a good list of equipment that he wanted pared down, and we answered based on what is common and sensible (many bushwalkers do take more than one camera: I have a Russian colleague who takes a Nikon digital and a Hasselblad 503CX with flexbody). Further, I can guarantee that well-executed photography, be it landscape, wilderness et al, has a good and receptive audience — and buyers, too — but it must be produced up to a very high standard, and your reputation will be made on the foundations of how much quality and effort you are putting into both getting "out there" to the subject and bringing the subject back skillfully in photographs—irrespective of perceived "perfect time of day and year, perfect weather etc.", none of which is true in reality. We learn to photograph well in all conditions.
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 10-05-2009 at 09:51 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #30

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    Denis, I go into the bush to take photos just for myself. If other people like them or don't like them, I don't really care. I enjoy the bushwalking, even if I am carrying a heavy load, but the photos are the reason I go walking in the first place, and I find that I appreciate the places I visited more because I have taken the trouble to photograph them.
    Mike

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