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  1. #21

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    I used to like him - if he's the same guy who did battle with Fred Picker years ago ! learly the man needs to get out more and smell the Dektol

    Bob H

    P.S. - and as for variant meter construction............kidding
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  2. #22

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    Interesting article, gives light to what has happen to photograph in the last few years!

    Jeff

  3. #23
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Sounds to me like he never really learned to use a light meter. And "You didn't know how the exposure was going to look until you had the film developed, so you set the camera based on the light meter."??? I can hear Ansel rolling over now!
    I agree that the image form the dicam shows what the photo will look like, but I have a pretty good idea what my film will look like too. Not that I haven't been mistaken. That little screen on the back of the camera may not look like the 11 X 14 print either. Still takes some work and experience, IMHO.
    To each his own.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  4. #24
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    "....takes some work and experience, IMHO."

    Sure does.

    On my first class I took with Monte Zucker, a few years ago, I was amazed that one of the first ideas, he said was that he was going to learn as much as his students. Didn't make any difference to him, film or digital capture, it's equipment and much more goes into creating photographs than equipment. He did make the transition to digital because of many reasons. His photography never suffered because of digital capture versus film. I was amazed at how simple his stuff was and how great his images he made. He was my mentor and coach.

  5. #25
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I couldn't resist adding a reply on the blog. In the course of my workshops over the last four or five years, I've converted MANY digital shooters to handheld meters. The bottom line is, it doesn't matter how good the in-camera meter is if the operator doesn't understand how it works, and most of the professional shooters I've taught do not. They have no idea why the camera is exposing the way it is; they're just assuming it must be right. That's fine when you're shooting in soft, even light, but it doesn't work so hot in backlit situations. The camera simply can't read your mind. It doesn't know what you want the picture to look like.

    Add a handheld meter, and people suddenly begin to understand exposure, and realize it's not nearly so complicated as they thought. It's amazing how much more fun it is to shoot when you're not "hoping" the exposure is OK.

    - CJ

  6. #26
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    APUG has had at least one member who consistently uses and recommends to others using Nikon F5/6 bodies in matrix metering mode to meter for 4x5 color transparency shots. They are his light meters for sheet film shooting. I've seen several others recommend something similar here on APUG.
    When I need a spot meter for my Hasselblad, I use my Nikon F100 to check the brightest, darkest, and what I want to be 18% gray.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #27

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    Do you understand?

    Do you gents not understand? What that post says is that IF you are shooting with a DSLR, THEN you no longer need a flash meter when using off-camera strobes.

    What part of that assertion don't you agree with? Do you yourself shoot with DSLRs using monoblocks or a pack-and-head system and yet still use a separate handheld flash meter? Are you acquainted with working studio professionals who shoot with DSLRs or medium-format digital backs and studio strobes and yet still use handheld flash meters for every shot? (I can actually understand using a meter to help set up complicated multi-light setups with careful ratios, but the example I used in the post concerned a single monoblock shot through an umbrella.) If you do, please name them. I'd like to contact them. I'd be curious to learn why they're doing it that way.

    Mike Johnston

  8. #28
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    First, we're not all gents.

    Secondly, there are plenty of "working studio professionals" who still use handheld flash meters, Mike. I would suggest you pop over to www.ilovephotography.com (entirely child portrait photographers, almost entirely digital) and pose that question. You'll find more than you think. It's not necessarily a matter of "need", it's a matter of choice.

    Live and let live. If you don't feel it's a relevant tool anymore, don't use it. It's silly, though, to think everyone will agree with you.

    - CJ

  9. #29

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    ...Oh, and by the bye, I was a custom black-and-white printer for years, I used to teach darkroom printing, I used to be Editor-in-Chief of a darkroom magazine, and I wrote more than 80 columns for the English Black & White Photography magazine. Photographs printed by me are in major museum collections all over the world. I have my Dektol-smelling credentials in order, thanks.

    MJ

  10. #30
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcjohnston View Post
    Do you gents not understand?

    Mike Johnston
    Some don't understand how to read or keep an even keel, Mike. You've always struck me as able to do both.
    Have enjoyed your writing for years.

    Lee

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