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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post
    2F/2F, this is one of the few occasions that I have to disagree with something you said. My Leica M's are MUCH easier to focus in low light than any SLR.
    +1
    Low light ease of focus is considered to be one of the greatest advantages to the rangefinder camera.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  2. #12
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    You didn't mention which Gov't buildings you were going to be in, but last time i was in D.C. (2 years ago), security wouldn't let me take anything in except for my keys, cell phone, and wallet. Everything else they would turn you away. I'm guessing though that where you're going aren't the standard "touristy" places.

    Personally, I would take a rangefinder because I've had good luck with them in lower light.
    Last edited by jcorll; 02-11-2010 at 01:32 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Didn't make sense!
    My weapons consist of 11 cameras. And counting... Be afraid.

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  3. #13

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    I would ask my friend to check out the regs about cameras for you. If you have to give up the camera at the security check-in you'll either have to check it (if they will do that), which I don't like doing, or not go in.

  4. #14

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    I have to disagree back.

    I will say that focusing wides in general is easier with a RF than with an SLR, but accurately focusing a RF in low, flat light is one of the hardest things for me to do when shooting. I find that SLRs are a breeze in comparison.
    2F/2F

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  5. #15
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I have to disagree back.

    I will say that focusing wides in general is easier with a RF than with an SLR, but accurately focusing a RF in low, flat light is one of the hardest things for me to do when shooting. I find that SLRs are a breeze in comparison.
    Touche and counterpoint. I bought my first Leica M with a 90mm f2 Summicron to shoot live dance performances. Some of them have been pretty Stygian... The M was much easier to focus in the theaters than the SLRs I had been using before.

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  6. #16
    DBP
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    It very much depends on where you are going. Ask your friend to ask.

  7. #17

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    Your Fuji rangefinder should be no problem. I took my Fuji GW690 to some museums when we had family visiting. I live in the DC area and routinely take my photography gear (sometimes Pentax 645N and lens(es)) to work or to meetings - both at Federal Gov't agencies - where you pass through security.

    Depending on where you are visiting, lighting might not be all that bad. Keep a light meter handy and meter often when moving from venue to venue. Have it preset soon after you enter a new setting for surprises.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I have to disagree back.

    I will say that focusing wides in general is easier with a RF than with an SLR, but accurately focusing a RF in low, flat light is one of the hardest things for me to do when shooting. I find that SLRs are a breeze in comparison.
    I've found that unless one has the proper VF to go with a wide (<= 24), that an SLR wins out for the feel of framing, perspective, and width that wide-angles typically provide. 35mm feels right on my M4, but 28mm feels way more right on my F3 than it does on my M4's viewfinder. Even though it's capable of it at the extremes - it doesn't convey the same feeling of immersion. Hard to explain unless you know what I mean.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by yurihuta View Post
    Your Fuji rangefinder should be no problem. I took my Fuji GW690 to some museums when we had family visiting. I live in the DC area and routinely take my photography gear (sometimes Pentax 645N and lens(es)) to work or to meetings - both at Federal Gov't agencies - where you pass through security.

    Depending on where you are visiting, lighting might not be all that bad. Keep a light meter handy and meter often when moving from venue to venue. Have it preset soon after you enter a new setting for surprises.
    Yuri-

    I think that's in part because you are an employee of the agency. As a visitor, I think the question would be asked, "why do you want to do this?" perhaps strongly, depending on the agency. Several agencies where I have worked, this would not be allowed, period. Heck, some of them try to prevent you from even photographing the outside of the building from a public sidewalk!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Yuri-

    I think that's in part because you are an employee of the agency. As a visitor, I think the question would be asked, "why do you want to do this?" perhaps strongly, depending on the agency. Several agencies where I have worked, this would not be allowed, period. Heck, some of them try to prevent you from even photographing the outside of the building from a public sidewalk!
    why do you want to do this? In a place like Union Station, or the National Gallery of Art, I can imagine that you might see some photographic possibilities (especailly Union Station). But not where the actual work of government takes place.

    In most place where I've wanted to photograph the real deal killer is tripods, not cameras. As long as whatever you're using is hand held you shouldn't have much trouble. I've never been approached, even in Union Station, by any security clones when using my Hasselblad with a 250mm Sonnar attached. I find a trash can or a pilaster to brace against and have gotten some nice negatives that way.

    But I've been run off of just about every public property in town before I could even get the third leg of a tripod planted on the ground or floor.
    Jim

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