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  1. #11
    wclark5179's Avatar
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    What about this one:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Ballhead.html

    I've got an older version and it works great.
    Bill Clark

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    For a strong lightweight ballhead, I also like the Acratech. To use a 35mm camera with a ballhead, I highly recommend using a bullseye level that mounts in the flash shoe.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    This is a later variation on Manfrotto's 222 trigger grip, designed to be matched with the 055 series tripods with the horizontal/vertical switching centre column, adding a lot more clever variations to tripod-head set ups. I used the 222 trigger grip for 8 years before moving to ball heads (it was a very cold grip to use in winter). The benefit of the 322RC2 grip, in common with the 222 grip, is in there being no danger of the camera falling unintentionally unless explicitly directed to, so it has a very strong selling point. Some people may be able to get away with using long lenses on these grips (and other ballheads mentioned here), but generally I think a low profile, heavy duty ball head with a large plate interface is what's needed for long-lens use.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  4. #14
    fotch's Avatar
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    I might also add that the quick release plates made be Really Right Stuff and Kirk are way better than the Bogen plates, especially the L plates.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #15

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    Guys, thanks for the feedback but what I actually seek for is a comparison between these two types of head, not by the features (ease of set up, level etc.) but by the weight/support stability ratio.
    For example : given the same 0.46kgs and same material which one will give more stability?
    I suspect pan/tilt is slightly better due to shaft type axis for each movement, hence good contact and better rigidity. But that is my stupid guessing...

  6. #16
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    For a strong lightweight ballhead, I also like the Acratech. To use a 35mm camera with a ballhead, I highly recommend using a bullseye level that mounts in the flash shoe.

    True, David. I actually used two bullseyes: one on the previous grip, and the other in the camera hotshoe and the design of the hotshoe means that the level there will not quite agree with the level in the grip, and thus the hotshoe level had priority. It's now spot-on with visual (viewfinder) referencing.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  7. #17
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    Guys, thanks for the feedback but what I actually seek for is a comparison between these two types of head, not by the features (ease of set up, level etc.) but by the weight/support stability ratio.
    For example : given the same 0.46kgs and same material which one will give more stability?
    I suspect pan/tilt is slightly better due to shaft type axis for each movement, hence good contact and better rigidity. But that is my stupid guessing...

    Is it?
    Well, it's best that you take you equipment along to a retailer and try it out in the real world. We are only telling you what is in common use and may be applied, but in the end you need to get your equipment set up in-store to determine what is best beyond doubt. I don't rely on guesswork when selecting heads, neither should you.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  8. #18

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    Exactly Gary, that's why I was hoping someone can give technical information. Too many bias in the store so I'd like to do my homework before heading there.

  9. #19

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    I guess we need to know what a "small" ball head is.
    I think any brand head of similar size will give ~equal results. Upgrade to a larger ball head or pan head & you'll be better off. Depends how you like to control the camera., individual tilt/yaw/pan or single knob for all three. IMO larger weights are more easily controlled with individual levers=pan head. Smaller devices with a single knob=ball head.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  10. #20
    fotch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    Exactly Gary, that's why I was hoping someone can give technical information. Too many bias in the store so I'd like to do my homework before heading there.
    For technical info, contact the mfg. I think most users will give you user terms, like smooth operation, solid when locked, safe for camera and lens.

    I don't find things like Alloy M59 to mean anything. When looking for a ball head and the different brands, I found Google gave links to those who compared the low cost look alike to the well know brand names. All reported poor quality construction, materiel's, and basically said not worth anything, with details and photos to make their points.

    That to me, was a big help. Good luck in your search.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

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