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  1. #11
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    P.S If you buy a Sekonic L758 to calibrate it to your film or digital sensor you need to plug the meter into your computer with the USB cable, supplied software and buy the very expensive test target http://www.fotosense.co.uk/sekonic-e...ightmeter.html and the meter needs to be calibrated http://english.sekonic.co.jp/meter_l_758
    Last edited by benjiboy; 12-04-2010 at 11:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  2. #12
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    I've been using the Sekonic L-758D for a few years now with film cameras and have never had a problem. It's the best meter I've ever used, and I don't miss my Gossen one bit.

    To each their own.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  3. #13
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    The test target is only for calibrating digital cameras, not film.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

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  4. #14

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    To each his or her own is absolutely correct. For some, a multi-meter of the modern digital variety makes sense. For others, like myself, it does not. I rarely use flash, and I prefer simple single-purpose meters with analog scales, so a Pentax spot meter and an separate incident meter work best for me.
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  5. #15
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Indeed. Thank God for options, eh?
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  6. #16
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I'm afraid your assertion is completely wrong http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7SZ58CugpY
    The Sekonic can be calbrated, but doesn't have to be. This is an optional feature, and the meter works great without worrying about it.

    For that matter, most meters can be calibrated, just not by the end user.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  7. #17
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I know it can be used without calibration Jeff I did a lot of research before buying my last light meter, but the point I was trying to make was it can be calibrated for individual films as well digital sensors with the test target, but If you aren't going to use the calibration facility, the Gossen Starlte that has a specific Zone facility, which is what the original question was about, is the most suitable for the OPs requirements and IMO the Gossen is a better buy.
    Ben

  8. #18
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    for the OPs requirements and IMO the Gossen is a better buy.
    I have no experience with the Starlite, so I can't offer a hands-on comparison.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  9. #19
    CGW
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    "A man with one clock always knows the time. A man with two or more is never sure."

    This sums up the calibration issue for me. IIRC, most of the hi-end Sekonics(e.g., 508, 558, 608, 758)have a calibration function in 1/10 stop increments. I'm a little dubious about the Gossen on-board "zone" calibration feature--sounds nice but...The Sekonic target method seems vulnerable to error. Besides, I've got enough USB ports in my life already!

  10. #20
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I didn't buy the Starlite Jeff because I don't use the Zone System as such personally' but I tried all the top of the range light meters hands on at my local pro dealers before I actually bought a Kenko KFM 2100 http://kenkoglobal.com/kfm-2100.html ( formally the Minolta Flash meter V1) proved to be perfect for my requirements, but if I was A Zoner in particular I would have got the Gossen.
    Ben

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