Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,951   Posts: 1,557,951   Online: 1031
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    114

    A small lightweight tripod - options?

    Hey guys.

    So I`m going to Peru in April and I`m trying to get my gear ready and pick up some spare accessories before I go that`ll help. I already have a tripod, albeit a cheap plastic one, but it`s too big. I`ve seen some very lightweight black tripods that have thin round legs and have completely independent movements. So it`s something like that, maybe around 4ft in height, that I`m looking for. And It needs to support a Bronica etr-si MF camera. Do you guys know of any that are cheap? I`ve found one, a Quantaray QSX Ultra-Pro but it has terrible reviews.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,306
    Images
    4
    The Tiltall is my favorite all-round tripod. But I also like my Bogen 3001 as a lighter weight alternative. I use it for 35mm, but might be OK for your ETR.

    Bogen is now Manfrotto; who was the original manufacturer. The numbering/naming scheme has changed, so it's no longer "3001", but I think it's now their 190 series. It's a basic aluminum tripod that may be the cheapest good tripod you can find.

    With tripods it's pick 2: good, cheap, lightweight
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    Bogen is now Manfrotto; who was the original manufacturer. The numbering/naming scheme has changed, so it's no longer "3001", but I think it's now their 190 series.
    Though sold under that name in the U.S. (and there only), Manfrotto never was Bogen. Manfrotto always has made, and still does make these things.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,306
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Though sold under that name in the U.S. (and there only), Manfrotto never was Bogen. Manfrotto always has made, and still does make these things.

    You're correct. Bogen was an importer and dealer of much photographic hardware. I don't know whether they actually manufactured anything themselves. The tripods were branded "Bogen" but made by Manfrotto.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern england
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    617
    Quote Originally Posted by Treymac View Post
    I`ve found one, a Quantaray QSX Ultra-Pro but it has terrible reviews.
    I wouldn't rely too closely on reviews for the job you need a tripod for. Any support that's light enough for backpacking would be a total fail in a studio and vice versa. I'd guess your typical shot might be half a second or so - any tripod that can achieve that without collapsing under the weight of a medium format camera is sufficient.

    If a trip is photo intensive I carry an ancient aluminium tripod with square section aluminium legs, but it's still heavy enough to cuss at by the end of a day. For occasional use that doesn't require head height shooting you can buy plastic tripods with multi ball legs which can lock round tree branches and other solid objects for about £8.00.

    You won't find a perfect answer, if it's solid it'll be heavy, it's a case of where you compromise.

  6. #6
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,918
    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    You're correct. Bogen was an importer and dealer of much photographic hardware. I don't know whether they actually manufactured anything themselves. The tripods were branded "Bogen" but made by Manfrotto.
    That's right I think they were like Vivitar who didn't actually manufacture anything, Manfrotto recently bought Gitzo I understand.
    Ben

  7. #7
    dhosten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    77
    Images
    4
    I use a Manfrotto 055 (old version) with 3 way head for most of my stuff, but sometimes just take my Cullman Magic foldable tripod. I have never put anything really heavy on it, but have put my 9x12 Avus on it, and have put a Rolleiflex TLR, and my Sony DSLR on it. The Cullman Magic is, to me at least, the best backpacking tripod in terms or weight and quality and price. A carbon Gitzo would get you better stability and probably the same weight for many times the price. Depends on your need. Rugged country = Manfrotto. Side of the road/well trodden path = Manfrotto/Cullman Magic.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    That's right I think they were like Vivitar who didn't actually manufacture anything, Manfrotto recently bought Gitzo I understand.
    Not quite.
    Both Manfrotto and Gitzo are owned by the same company, the British multinational called the Vitec Group.
    This holding company bought Gitzo almost 20 years ago, Manfrotto a few years before that (and Bogen a year later).
    Though manufacturing has moved, both brands still exist as separate entities, i.e. continue their own product lines.

  9. #9
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,360
    Images
    20
    If you're looking for something inexpensive, try to find an older Marchioni or Leitz Tiltall. It's 6 lbs with the head included (the head isn't easily removable). In good condition they're around $100, and they were made to hold a 4x5" press camera.

    If you've got a little more (well, three times more) money to spend and want a very compact carbon fiber tripod, I've been using this one for several months now, and it offers a lot of bang for the buck--

    http://reallybigcameras.com/Feisol/Traveler_Class.htm

    The comparable Gitzo is around $1100 last I checked, and the Gitzo has certain advantages, like legs that don't turn, but the question is whether those advantages are worth the difference in price.

    I use my Feisol CT-3441S with a small Linhof ballhead usually or an Acratech ballhead with larger cameras, and I've cut the telescoping center column, because it's not a feature I want, and it's lighter and more solid without the telescoping joint and extension. For such a small tripod, it's a surprisingly good support. I've used it with my ultralight Gowland 8x10", and within limits (wide to normal lenses, not too much bellows extension, no high winds), it's fairly steady.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #10
    onepuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Scotland
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    95
    Have you considered a Benbo? I have a Trekker MkII and it is reasonably light but very sturdy and will certainly accommodate your Bronica. It also has very flexible movements with the legs able to be placed in virtually any plane and the legs are sealed to stop water ingress.
    " ... a cook who relies on nothing but a sharp knife has no guarantee of producing excellent dishes." - Yoshihisa Maitani

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin