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  1. #1
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    How useful is a monopod???

    I have been thinking about getting a monopod to use for those marginal times when I don't want to carry a tripod. A monopod seems like it would be very useful...you see all the sports photographers using them.

    I know it won't replace my tripod for long exposures but what about when you are in the woods and you want to use a larger aperture or the lighting conditions are a stop or two less than what you feel good about unsupported. I know I could try to find a tree or a rock or fence etc. but most of the time those methods change the perspective.

    Do you think monopods are useful?
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  2. #2

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    A Piece of String–The Movie! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLlJl7TbXTA
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  3. #3
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    I'm going to try it and see! It makes sense...
    Who has tried this?
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  4. #4

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    Depends on how heavy your camera rig is. I've shot plenty of professional sports, and am always puzzled by people who put a monopod on a lightweight 70-200 zoom or a 300 f/4 lens.

    Monopods get the way with small lenses. They can be a tripping hazard for other people.

    I find them useful when shooting with "big" glass, such as a 500mm or 600mm f/4 lens, or with a 300 f/2.8 indoors when the shutter speed is down to a 1/60 of a second.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  5. #5
    ann
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    I use one a lot, as the equipment is heavier these days, (it is called aging). They can be helpful, but you do have to be careful if surrounded by people, or it can keep them away
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  6. #6
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    I have a $50-ish manfrotto monopod.

    I like it for 300/2.8 use indoors or for long periods outdoors. A short game comprised of a series of periods or quarters doesn't make a 300/2.8 heavy enough to need one (for me), but an all day event it is nice to have, such as motorsports multi-day events. You can pan a lot easier with a monopod than a tripod.

    The monopod is also nice with my speed graphic for better-than-handheld stabilization. I like a tripod in the woods, but a monopod is nice to travel with or take for hikes compared to a tripod.

  7. #7

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    I use a monopod once in a while, usually for 35mm. Sometimes 120, for TLR. Other than that, use a tripod.

    Jeff

  8. #8
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    For the "smaller" medium format cameras, or 35mm in low light situations, I use my monopod on a regular basis. It wouldn't do for my RB67, so I'll use my bogen tripod for that. The monopod works well for a walking stick in dicey terrain, and can also be used to ward off the general public whenthey start asking why I still use film.

  9. #9
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    I generally shoot 35mm film of 100 ASA or slower and the mono pod gives me confidence that may not be necessary, but its' there. The one-time experience that worked only because I had the pod with me was shooting an outdoor graduation ceremony and I could raise the camera well above the crowd (Syracuse University) and fire from the self timer. A shot I couldn't get otherwise. I think everyone should have a mono pod in their arsenal

  10. #10
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    A monopod with a ball head would be awesome. But you need to be able to adjust the angle of the light path to the film other than by just leaning this way or that. But it can come in VERY handy in a pinch.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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