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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    If you like Sekonic and want a true 1 degree spot meter, look into the 508 or slightly pricier(and newer)558. Since film and developing aren't getting any cheaper, I'm not a fan of antique meters, whatever their historical reputation for accuracy, that require battery hacks or tack-on "spot" attachments limited to 10-15 degrees coverage.
    In the circumstances the OP's talking about there's a need for a fast, almost fool proof meter. Simplicity is the key, it's not about vintage or I'd have said get a meter like my late 1930's AVO meter, which happens to be accurate

    Sure some Gossen Luna Pro's/Lunasix's are older than others but they are built like Leica's to last, and the official battery converter is not a hack. No they aren't spotmeters but the 7°/15° attachment is very useful at times.

    I mainly use Spotmeters (I have 3) but I also use Gossen Luna Pro's (I have 2), both types give me the same exposure settings, but that's because I know how to interpret their readings.

    In a fast working situation where light's variable I'd far rather use a meter like the Luna Pro, a Weston V or Euromaster, or equivalent, that's why I've always had a meter like these for the past 35+ years.

    Ian

  2. #12
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    In the circumstances the OP's talking about there's a need for a fast, almost fool proof meter. Simplicity is the key, it's not about vintage or I'd have said get a meter like my late 1930's AVO meter, which happens to be accurate

    Sure some Gossen Luna Pro's/Lunasix's are older than others but they are built like Leica's to last, and the official battery converter is not a hack. No they aren't spotmeters but the 7°/15° attachment is very useful at times.

    I mainly use Spotmeters (I have 3) but I also use Gossen Luna Pro's (I have 2), both types give me the same exposure settings, but that's because I know how to interpret their readings.

    In a fast working situation where light's variable I'd far rather use a meter like the Luna Pro, a Weston V or Euromaster, or equivalent, that's why I've always had a meter like these for the past 35+ years.

    Ian
    The Sekonic 508/558/758 are straightforward as any meter I've used. A simpler, incident-only Sekonic is the 308(about as simple as it gets), which I use as often as the 558 when I don't need spot metering. Some of the oldies work flawlessly but others don't due to age-related problems. The OP can buy what he likes but there's a bit of a false economy in older meters I'd rather avoid by buying the newest model I could afford.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I wouldn't want to be limited to a pure spot meter for wedding work. When I was shooting weddings, I used my meter (a Gossen Profisix/Luna Pro SBC) in incident mode mostly.

    The tiny Gossen Digiflash that I'm using mostly now is very nice, and for wedding work, offers flash metering and fits well in a suit-coat pocket.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
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    Spot meters may seem to be answer to all your exposure problems, but in the hands of novices are very dangerous weapons, because the result depends on where the meter operator points the spot, how he interprets the reading, and how much he knows about the principals of exposure.
    Ben

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Something like a Gossen Luna Pro would be ideal, with a 7°/15° spot attachment, also has the cone diffuser as well.

    Ian
    Yes, again. But I would add that a Luna Pro SBC model is preferable.

  6. #16

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    +1 for SBC

  7. #17
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    + & - 1 for a Luna Pro SBC

    I have both, the SBC in the UK and a plain Luna Pro/ProfiSix here in Turkey. Both are excellent meters but the Luna Pro SBC is chunkier (larger & heavier), I like both, can use either and still get consistent results.

    Ian

  8. #18

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    Just a thought.... if speed is of an essence, why not get a metering prism for your Bronica? True, it won't be universally useful but it'll be fast and less thing to carry around in fast paced weddings....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #19
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    With my SQ-A I use either a Gossen Digisix, which I bought new a few years back, or a Sekonic L-508 picked up used. But then, I don't go anywhere near weddings if I can help it!

    For most things I find incident readings with the Digisix sufficient. But to get really serious, the L-508 adjusts to a spot from 4º down to 1º, and it looks cool as all get-out to awe bystanders! (I'm still waiting to be asked if it's a video camera.)

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Just a thought.... if speed is of an essence, why not get a metering prism for your Bronica? True, it won't be universally useful but it'll be fast and less thing to carry around in fast paced weddings....
    I've considered it, but I heard it drains the battery quite a bit. Actually, I was thinking of going waist level finder at first when I got the Bronica, but found that the prism finder is less confusing (no need to reverse composition in my head) and quicker to use. My eyesight is pretty harsh too, so I'd be poking that waist level finder into my eye before I could see really clearly So prism finder it is.

    So the metered prism is an option, but yeah... the battery drain is my main concern. I figure without the metered prism my battery (SR44) should last a year or two, and I should be able to get more accurate metering with a light meter... dependent on my technique of course.

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