Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,954   Posts: 1,586,010   Online: 679
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32
  1. #1
    dj_judas21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    61

    Tripod recommendation for medium format

    I'm looking for tripod recommendations. I mainly use a Mamiya RB67 which is about 4kg with accessories. I would also use the tripod with my 35mm SLRs, rangefinders and a DSLR (sorry)

    I currently have an extremely light and flimsy tripod for travelling (it folds up to about 35cm long and fits in a rucksack) which is OK for the rangefinders and DSLR but bends under the weight of the RB67.

    I also have a larger, stronger but still cheap tripod which has sturdy legs but a cheap, brittle plastic head with awkward knobs to adjust it. It's vaguely acceptable for shooting landscapes with the RB67 but is difficult to adjust and doesn't stand a chance of working satisfactorily with an 800mm lens on my 35mm SLR.

    So, I am after recommendations for a tripod that:
    • is strong enough for a 4kg RB67
    • is stable enough for an 800mm lens for astrophotography
    • is reasonably small and light, for hiking
    • has extra quick-release plates available so I can keep one permanently on each camera

    I can probably suss out most of these criteria, but I don't know if I should be looking at a pan/tilt head, or a ball head. What are the pros and cons of each?

    I hesitate to say this, but I don't really have a limit on my budget I understand that good kit doesn't come cheap, and the time has come to replace my £15 tripod with something that will help me take better pictures.

    Thanks!
    Jonathan

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,252
    Images
    34
    Induro AKB-2 or AKP-2. The AKB-2 is a ball head and will handle your RB 67 easily, and is still light enough not to wear you down packing it around. The AKP-2 is the pan head version of the same tripod. The price of these is very reasonable, under $200usd with shipping (here in the States).
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,644
    Images
    152
    You won't regret spending money on a tripod and head. I use a Feisol four section CT3401 (the smallest one Kerry Thalmann sells) and and a Kirk BH3 head. I use it for both my Hasselblad and my 4x5 and it is great. The weight of your camera shouldn't be a problem on this tripod. I love this head and tripod. If money really isn't an object, you might also consider the equivalent Gitzo legset.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    305
    Good kits do come cheap... 100 usd tiltall tripod is more than enough... But if you want some strong legs a feisol 3441 is good enought

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,934
    I geuss you could look up KEH.

    Jeff

  6. #6
    agw
    agw is offline

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Munich, Germany
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    33
    I fear "stable enough for 800mm" and "reasonably light for hiking" is a contradiction. In general, 800mm or the likes will need the most sturdy legs and head you can get, and those never will be lightweight (even CF legs).

    You might look at http://www.gitzo.com/ to get an impression of which kind of legs you need for with focal length and weight.

    While Gitzo certainly is not cheap, they're among the best you can get, and will last a lifetime (I bought my Gitzo about 20 years ago, and it still works like new. Doesn't look so, though.). I'd not consider less than Gitzo legs and a RRS, Kirk or Markins head for serious use. If you're less serious, work your way down the price range on the legs first (lots of cheaper choices from far east recently), then on the head. There's nothing worse than putting a wobbly head on good legs (been there, done that) - I'd always go for overkill on the head, and if necessary compromise a bit on the legs.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    S Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by heespharm View Post
    Good kits do come cheap... 100 usd tiltall tripod is more than enough... But if you want some strong legs a feisol 3441 is good enought
    I agree about the Tiltall. I bought one new many, many years ago. It has always held up extremely well. Mine is the original E. Leitz version. A couple years ago I decided to covert it's fixed pan tilt head to a standard center column w/platform design so I could interchange different heads. I had Adam at SK Grimes remove the pan tilt head and retool a platform with a 3/8" center stud and non skid mount surface. I also had them modify the original pan tilt head so it could be screwed on and off the center column. I mostly use the tripod with a Arca B1 and Wimberly baseplates. I regularly use the Tiltall / B1 combo with a Hasselblad 553ELX and 500mm. I use the tripod mount base on the 500mm to balance the rig by adding a Wimberly P10 plate to the the lens' tripod mount, I clamp the body and lens combo using that plate into the B1. Makes a very nice set up for medium format and could easily handle the RB and a 800. If you were to use a Tiltall with standard pan tilt head I would recommend swapping out the long handle that is standard with a short handle. Tiltalls can be highly modified and many parts are available without going the custom machining route. Highly reliable and highly configurable. A very nice tripod. New ones are not built the same as the originals. Learn about all versions.

  8. #8
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,848
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by dj_judas21 View Post
    ... I hesitate to say this, but I don't really have a limit on my budget I understand that good kit doesn't come cheap, and the time has come to replace my £15 tripod with something that will help me take better pictures. ...
    Jonathan

    Being on a tight budget is tough, but since you live in the UK, it's easy: skip a few pints (or whatever else your vice may be), don't go out to dinner a couple of times, bring your lunch to work for a week and you're there.

    For architecture, landscape and studio photography, a decent camera support is essential. In most cases, any tripod is better than none, but one should always choose the best tripod your money can buy or one will spend it twice.

    Furthermore, the choice of tripod head is as important as the tripod itself, and the choice of materials contributes to the final performance and transportability. No tripod is less rigid than the one left at home, because it was too heavy. I have used many brand-name tripod models, in a variety of materials and styles, from traditional aluminum models to modern carbonfiber composite designs. Each model had its pros and cons. No design is optimal in every situation. Consider your photographic needs before you decide on a tripod, based on weight, size, working height, operation speed or rigidity.

    Then check the Gitzo site, mentioned above (www.gitzo.com), or go to he Manfrotto site (www.manfrotto.com), and look at their recommendations for your weight class.

    Good tripods cost little more than bad ones!
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #9
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,644
    Images
    152
    Sorry, I missed the hiking and astrophotography. If they are separate activities, get an old massive tripod like the tilt-all and a lighter carbon tripod from Gitzo/Feisol/Induro. For astrophotography, you may want a geared head like the ones Manfrotto makes....it makes it easy to make small adjustments. Unfortunately, if you are looking for light, sturdy and inexpensive, you can only pick two of those attributes!

    Just remember, a tripod can be used across multiple cameras and don't get out dated. Buy the best if you can. I went through 2 Manfrotto tripods before I broke down and got a carbon Feisol/Kirk head. I wasted the money I spent on the first two!

  10. #10
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,986
    I would suggest a tripod that does not gain weight with every step away from the car.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin