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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony-S View Post
    Here are a couple that I metered with the Pocket Light Meter app on my iPhone.

    4x5 Korona, Fujinon 90mm f/8, Delta 100 in Pyrocat HD.

    Old Fall River Road creek, Rocky Mountain National Park

    Bronica GS-1 6x7cm, 110mm f/4 Macro, Delta 100 in XTOL.

    Avalanche Creek 1, Glacier National Park
    Since this thread is about the efficacy of the i-thingy meter, I have to ask is there any shadow detail on the negatives? Because on my screen the pictures look underexposed. I do quite a lot of very similar work under similar lighting and always get much more shadow detail. But then I have the disadvantage of using a 50+ year old LunaSix. And 100 year old lenses.

  2. #62
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Since this thread is about the efficacy of the i-thingy meter, I have to ask is there any shadow detail on the negatives? Because on my screen the pictures look underexposed. I do quite a lot of very similar work under similar lighting and always get much more shadow detail. But then I have the disadvantage of using a 50+ year old LunaSix. And 100 year old lenses.
    I know you're poking fun, but the 100 year old lenses themselves will help open up the shadows.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I know you're poking fun, but the 100 year old lenses themselves will help open up the shadows.
    Well, yes and no. You still have to expose properly. The slight diffuse flare ( there's very little with a masked compendium and only two internal surfaces) will help get the film off the toe of the curve, thus opening up the shadows a bit. It's one of the reasons I use the lenses, that and the smooth tonality.
    I get good shadow detail with the set of modern coated lenses which I use on 4x5, too. And then there's the possibilty that it's something to do with my monitor, or the contrast range the poster chose.
    But if that's what is on the negatives, the shadows are underexposed, and the contrast range of the scene is such that it isn't neccesary.

  4. #64
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Well, yes and no. You still have to expose properly. The slight diffuse flare ( there's very little with a masked compendium and only two internal surfaces) will help get the film off the toe of the curve, thus opening up the shadows a bit. It's one of the reasons I use the lenses, that and the smooth tonality.
    I get good shadow detail with the set of modern coated lenses which I use on 4x5, too. And then there's the possibilty that it's something to do with my monitor, or the contrast range the poster chose.
    But if that's what is on the negatives, the shadows are underexposed, and the contrast range of the scene is such that it isn't neccesary.
    That's what I meant. I gain effective film speed increase of about half a stop with older lenses, compared to newer ones.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #65
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    What's an iphone and does it have a clockwork mechanism? If so I want one.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    What's an iphone and does it have a clockwork mechanism? If so I want one.
    No clockwork, but they do make an acceptable skeet target.

  7. #67
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    Of course it's a stupid way to get a light meter, if that's the sole reason you're getting it. But if you've already got an iPhone (I don't know if there is a similar app for Android or Blackberry), then it would be stupid NOT to get the app, because you're almost always going to be carrying the phone with you, even if you forget your handheld meter. I've used the app and it is an excellent general purpose meter, and the way it works is equivalent to about a 5-degree spot meter. So you can do highlight and shadow metering to calculate the contrast range in a scene. Of course it isn't as good at that as my Minolta Spotmeter F, but that's horses for courses. The Spotmeter F (or the Sekonic 408) does me no good if they're at home or the battery is dead.

  8. #68
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Of course it's a stupid way to get a light meter, if that's the sole reason you're getting it. But if you've already got an iPhone (I don't know if there is a similar app for Android or Blackberry), then it would be stupid NOT to get the app...
    I just got this app and will try it out. I'm going on an overseas photo tour next month and I'm trying to carry as little gear as possible. All of the camera bodies I am taking have built in metering, but I still like to meter externally when circumstances are right. So, whether to take the spot meter, or the incident meter, or both? I usually have and use both with non-metered cameras. But, that's a lot of space in the camera bag, aside from the weight. If this app is any good - and from the reviews and this thread it seems to be - I can leave both meters and their battery requirements at home.

  9. #69
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    The meter works as good as any other meter as long as you understand it, just like any other meter. Be careful using the iThing as a meter, its chews through the battery life and you will need to charge it every night.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMBooth View Post
    The meter works as good as any other meter as long as you understand it, just like any other meter. Be careful using the iThing as a meter, its chews through the battery life and you will need to charge it every night.
    This is why I have a Mophie external battery/case for my iPhone. It adds a LITTLE bulk and weight but it about doubles the life of the battery.

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