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  1. #11
    spacer's Avatar
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    This is the quick-release rack I usually use for short runs, and here it's mounted to my Montague Paratrooper. The trunk bag is also quick-release,
    mounted in a channel in the center of the rack, so I can remove it and carry it around by its built-in strap like a normal camera bag. On the sides, what
    appear to be pockets are actually folding pannier bags. Nowhere near as roomy or tough as purpose-built panniers, but extremely handy when I need
    some extra space.
    The pack usually carries my non-bike stuff, like books, snacks, etc. If I'm needing capacity for a longer trip, I now have a permanent rack on my Surly,
    and nashbar panniers for the moment, but I'm gonna be looking into either building my own or finding a good set for future trips.

    I think it shouldn't be too difficult to insulate your camera gear from most vibration, but I haven't really studied the issue much yet. My Canonet is likely going to be my ride companion after it's CLA'd, and it'll be riding in a handlebar bag. Though.... it would be interesting to have one of the more compact 4x5 cameras along on a trip. Uh... a *short* trip.




    And my Surly... note the lovely Brooks saddle. Ahhhhh....
    Last edited by spacer; 07-08-2011 at 10:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    I've been giving some thought to the same thing; having just recently added a Cannondale Quick 5 hybrid to my toy collection. I also have some subjects in mind which are more easily accessed off a local rail trail. I have some ideas but haven't executed any of them yet. On my old road bike, I used a rear rack and a trunk bag with a sheet of "egg crate" foam in the bottom to occasionally carry a camera.

    I also have a handlebar bag that hangs from a sort of slingshot shaped heavy wire hanger that slips behind the stem and over the bars. I finally dug that out the other day and discovered the U that goes around the stem is a bit too narrow for this new-fangled bike. I plan to try some creative blacksmithery on it but haven't gotten to it. The straight bars on the new bike seem more cluttered with gadgets than the old road bike too, so I'm not sure the bag will work, but we'll see. Those trinkets get pricey, so I'd like to recycle if I can. With the odd sloping top tubes on hybrids, I fear I may not be able to get mine and my wife's bikes on my tailgate carrier if I put a rear rack on mine. The bars on one barely clear the rear wheel on the other as is, but maybe I'll be lucky.

    I envision putting my Bronica fitted with one lens in a padded surround in the trunk pack and place another lens or two and other miscellaneous stuff in the handlebar bag. The bar bag is pretty big, it easily carried my Canon A-1 with the 35-105 zoom and a sunshade installed, even with lots of home-kluged padding. I assume I can cobble together some way to hang a decent tripod on a frame tube or the rear rack, but we'll see. I do have a tripod carry strap that I could sling that across my back at probably less risk than a whole pack full of stuff.

    With unusual optimism, I'm not sure there's that much vibration, especially with some modest padding around the gear. That won't do much for big bounces, but I don't contemplate off road or stunt riding -- my bones are way too old for that!

    Guess we should post some pictures here if either of us gets set up.

  3. #13
    spacer's Avatar
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    I have a monopod that I've used mostly when we're hiking around Pinnacle and I don't want to lug the tripod. It collapses down to a size
    that wouldn't be at all objectionable on either of my racks, and I'm sitting here thinking about how I can attach it to the bike so that the
    wheels become the other two "legs".

    It's also short enough that I could mount it up front somewhere. It might be just the thing for that pit bull that lives south of Scott.

  4. #14

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    You need a solution that will protect the equipment (vibration, shock, and moisture), be easy enough to remove or access that it won't be a chore to stop and use the camera or take it with you if you leave the bike.

    When I was using a classic touring bicycle I had a bar bag carrier (Karrimor) as mentioned above. The bag (which I still use) was made by Agu Sport as a camera bag - more basic padding. Since the whole thing was suspended on a sprung frame and shock-corded to the font forks, it absorbed a lot of the vibration. Even survived a crash that took out the forks and my collar bone 8-)

    The Brompton folder I use has a frame attached front rack that works well to hold a padded bag. I have put my old bar-bag onto the Brompton Y bars directly. I often have a monopod strapped to the Brompton's single tube or across the front rack.

    I used to carry a single tent peg and guy line so I could stand my fully loaded touring bike upright when loading/unloading my camping gear. I got some odd looks, but it was very practical.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  5. #15
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for all the advice. I think I'm going to purchase a bike rack and bag to sit on top of the rack. You guys recommend any company or website that has a huge selection of almost every bike bag available?

  6. #16
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Spacer: is that first pic a painted Klein Mantra?
    K.S. Klain

  7. #17

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    I'd recommended Performance bike. You might even have a store somewhere near you. They have a pretty good return policy. You could also try backcountry.com and their sister companies.

    Dan

  8. #18

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    Hi, some time back I used to regularly use Bob Yak trailer on the back of my tourer to take along a 5x4 outfit in a bag, and an old wooden Gandolfi tripod. It worked a treat. I did consider that vibration from the road might be minimised as the camera was effectively slung between two axles, though it could have been my imagination. For any smaller format camera outfits I just pop them into a rear rack-mounted pannier, wrapped up in a fleece or something, just in case I ever take a tumble....

  9. #19

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    I only travel on my bike. I have my bag on my back. If you have panniers your cameras will be bouncing about and if you fall off their the first thing to hit the fall. If you have a well padded backpack and you fall off chances are you'll fall on to your side. I've fell of a couple of times and my camera has been fine every time.

  10. #20
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Bike riding with a pack is not safe during an accident or a fall. Panniers are better.
    I will second that advice. The same advice was given to me by my brother. In this case it was with regard to motorcycling rather than cycling but it applies just the same. In the event of an accident which throws you off of the bike, you do not want anything extra on you. Everything should be attached to the bike.

    You should see my brother's motorcycle when he has his bags, tent, fishing rods etc. attached to it!


    Steve.

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