Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,935   Posts: 1,585,614   Online: 691
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,666
    Images
    28

    How do you open a 110 film cassette?

    Okay, so I got my 16mm reel.

    Someone sent me some Sakuracolor SR-100 that is C-41 process in a 110 film. I would like to open the thing in my dark bag so I can load it on the reel.

    Is there any kind of pictorial guide or anything?

    edit: cartridge is in two pieces now, film safely loaded though.
    Last edited by Athiril; 07-22-2011 at 05:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Twist and shout is what I do with 126...
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  3. #3
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,666
    Images
    28
    I meant without breaking the cassette

  4. #4
    bsdunek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,157
    Images
    211
    From http://www.subclub.org/darkroom/roll110.htm

    To reload the cassette, you first have to take the cassette apart. This is not difficult if the room lights are on, but if you have exposed film in the cassette that you want to develop, you'll need to try to deconstruct the cassette in a dim light -- not an easy task. So, if it's your first cassette, just kiss the film inside goodbye. Turn those lights up, so you don't lose a finger. Carefully split the cassette along the seams with an X-acto knife. You don't need much pressure on the glued seams, but the seams are hard to find. If you are looking at the back of the cassette, one seam runs along the top UNDER the lip that runs along the top. The seams also run right down the middle of the tabs on each end of the cassette. On the bottom, the seams run around the front edges of each film spool. You may end up ruining your first cassette, but everything gets better with time! When you get it appart, you'll see that the film is attached to a spool in the take-up spool and is pulled out of the supply spool.

    Enjoy!
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  5. #5
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    I twist carefully and swear if it doesn't separate cleanly then. I don't use a knife.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,560
    First you load

    110 cassette
    35mm tub & lid
    dental pick

    into dark bag noting that there is a notch in backing paper to get pick into and underneath to pull paper and film out of take up spool.
    best to hold film away from plastic with lint free rag or glove
    the film should come away from backing you roll it up and drop into tub and cap.

    In day light

    sterilise scalpel
    separate glue lines

    blood does not make a good developer...

  7. #7
    ozphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,138
    Images
    1
    Just be aware of *not* dragging the film against the plastic - scratches galore!!!!

    I used 2 new 110 cassettes to show staff how to do this if the cassette was needed again by a customer - first one I just ripped the film out without a care in the world, the second I made sure to show them how to do it gently, to avoid scratching.

    Processed both rolls and let them take a look - one nice and clean the other had "railroad tracks" all the way along the film; deep enough that you could feel with finger nail.

    Definitely got the point across . . . . . .

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,560
    Hi

    Yes lint free glove or thumb piece needed and care.

    The new (ie current) Lomo cassettes will separate like OEM Kodak ones from '80 and '90. Slightly different design but good build standard.

  9. #9
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,956
    I always used a BFH [Big F*cking Hammer]
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #10
    ozphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,138
    Images
    1
    If anyone is a bit of a DIY-er, you could easily fit a bolt the same size as the spool hole to a heavy-ish piece of timber, and pull backwards on the canister. This "cracks" the 110/126 cassette for easy removal of the film.

    The dark boxes used in mini-labs have a similar version of this in them, to make reloading the film into special processor cassettes quick and painless.

    As long as you pull towards the flat side of the canister, it cracks nicely; on the odd occasion that it doesn't, **gently** twisting a flathead screwdriver will crack the spool area without damaging the film inside. Gentle and steady, not rough and haphazard, or you'll gouge the film.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin