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  1. #11
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Here are the leg connectors I was referring to.. still can't find them for sale just yet.

    http://www.lollychops.com/.a/6a00e55...a03f970c-popup

  2. #12

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    I didn't notice a reference that your project will enclosed. If not, be sure to get UV protective glasses. I have a lightbox from Edwards Engineering through Bostick & Sullivan which will handle up to 11x14 that has eight black-light fluorescent bulbs and approx. 2in clearance from the printing frame. The fan is always on when the lights are on. Exposure times vary with individual negatives, paper and emulsion.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #13
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Found the leg mounting bases (angled top plates).

    Good call on the glasses Jeffrey. I could add a velvet curtain that drapes around the sides though.

  4. #14
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    Good adice above, I am not certified, but do a lot of successful electric work.
    It is easer to think of electric like plumbing. Black (hot) is the high pressure water.. (just like a fire hose). A switch is simply a valve to turn the water on and off. The current goes in one side of the device and goes out the other side on the white (drain). It can also just go out the ground (messy just like a bad drain).
    Paralel man! Series and you get dim bulbs! Take a deep breath do it and you will soon understand not as complicated as it might seem.
    Green wire... use it. connect all the green wires together to the ground circuit, ground the metal frame to this if your project is metal. I know some old codgers will tell you you don't need no stinking ground. I like the idea, and think it can save you some pain or death.

  5. #15
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Wow, I think it's as good as built!

    About the ground though... I'm not planning on having any metal to speak of, except for maybe a reflective background, but white paint or reflective paint sounds good enough for that. I do want it to be safe though; what do I need in a ground?

  6. #16
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I just thought of a typical make up table in a dressing room that I have improvised numberous times.

    The ones I have helped to throw together with various community theatre companies out of sundry backsatge storage rooms to create 'proper' make up stations.

    We make the back board about 3-feet wide, put a string of 3 screw shells each side of the mirror, and one along the top, and then run a short return of about 6-8" out from the backboard on each side to separate one make up staion from the next. Actually this frame also helps to stabilise the vertical rear backframe. Ppaint the whole thing with white paint, to make the chip board look a little more pleasant, and then also improve the diffusion of the lights. Stick half of a back of bedroom door plastic mirror in the middle of the backboard at a slight down angle so the person can get a good view of face and hair while seated.

    Screw in 7 60w old fashioned incandescant lights and everyone is happy. Good diffuse lighting.

    So for this project I just threw things together kinda the same way - no mirror, two lights where the mirror would go, and then fiddled with the screw shell spacing while temporarily fitted with 25w incandescant footlight bulbs for visible output.

    I stuck my integrating dome refective light meter at a constant height over the edge of the box while it was inverted and played with distance from the side wall, and distance between lamps while the screw shells were held in place temporarily with masking tape to see what gave the most uniform output. Then I screwed them into place.

    The lights ended up further from the side wall than I thought they would- I guess a lot of the side output of all of the lamps bounces off the side wall more than I expected. Turning them sideways may have put more light out, but it would have been heaps more of a PIA. I presumed that UV would be refelcted the same way that vsible was, and so far this presumption appears to have held true. I tried with aluminum foil on the top behind the bulbs agiast the socket tops, but it gave me worse uniformity.

    Good luck with this project.
    my real name, imagine that.

  7. #17
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Take a look at rockler for the leg adapters. These and these look promising.

    Wire things in parallel as others have said. If any part of the frame is metal, such as the reflector then you want to ground that in case one of your wires comes loose and touches it. Without grounding it you won't know until you touch it. I would try to avoid any metal in the frame so I could not worry about grounding it. If your light sockets have ground screws use them.

  8. #18
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    One note; the CFLs are only 13 watts, so I'll be dealing with 91 watts, and potentially 182 if I were to get Y-adapters and doubled the # of bulbs (no plans at present, though I'd like to "overbuild"). How many amps though?
    That's easy to work out. Divide the watts by the volts. So 91 watts at 110v is less than 1 amp.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by vpwphoto View Post
    It is easer to think of electric like plumbing.
    Ha... I saw a white van on the freeway yesterday -- y'know, the kind with ladders -- belongingto an electrician. His license plate read "NOTPLUMNG".

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Wow, I think it's as good as built!

    About the ground though... I'm not planning on having any metal to speak of, except for maybe a reflective background, but white paint or reflective paint sounds good enough for that. I do want it to be safe though; what do I need in a ground?
    No offense, but seriously this is the point where you should be deciding not to do it. If you don't know the difference between parallel and series and why you would choose one over the other, nor what is required to achieve electrical safety, you should not be constructing anything using mains power. If you know that you don't know whether the result will be safe, you're a fool to build it.

    As an electrical engineer, I can not in good conscience give directions on how to do this even if it is extremely simple in the grand scheme of things electrical. Do you know, for example, the proper screw tension required to hold a copper wire securely without damaging it and having a live end come out? How the ends should be looped and twisted before inserting in the terminal to make a safe connection? So there's plenty that you don't know that you need to know to achieve safety, on top of the stuff you already know that you don't know.

    I will say that you should have an earth-leakage circuit breaker (commonly known as ELCB or ground fault interrupter / GFI) professionally installed in your house. They're mandatory here in AU now and they have a reasonable chance of saving you from a DIY project gone subtly wrong. Won't save you from an electrical fire though.

    "Do not meddle in the affairs of [wizards] for they are subtle and quick to anger".

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