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  1. #11
    fdi
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    If you are going to sell your prints fully framed then you can select any mat borders, equal or unequal, or bottom weighted that you feel most comfortable presenting your artwork with. If you are going to sell them mounted and matted, then you might consider matting them such that the frame size is a standard frame size such as 16x20 or 18x24. Then your customer will have an easier time finding a frame and will not be forced to take your image to a custom framer.

  2. #12
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    I do a lot of volume mounting. To make it easier, and quicker, I print with a one inch border around the print, and cut the window to expose 1/2 inch, of the paper border. I dry mount them. They are then bagged, to keep them clean.
    For other, unmounted prints, I store them in archival boxes.

    If you're planning on doing a lot of this, it's worth investing in a good mat cutter, with production stops, and buying mat board in 32x40 inch size. The windows you cut from a large print can be re-squared and used for smaller mats. Quality board is expensive, and this will give you the most bang for your buck.

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    Interesting -- decades of dry-mounting and I never have had that happen. But I have always used Seal products.

    And since I "float" the print inside the window, I would have seen it.

    Vaughn
    These days dry mounting tissues have changed, I've still got quite a large supply of Ademco (The Adhesive Dry Mounting Company) tissue left that I bought more than 35 years ago, I was given an Ademco dry mounting press when a local newspaper switched to RC papers in the 70's. These older tissues are shellac based and it was always recommended that the tissue be cut slightly undersized 1/16th of an inch on all sides, they required quite a bit of heat and pressure to get the best results. Slightly too long or too much pressure and the adhesive could bleed badly if cut to the exact size.

    PE/RC prints couldn't stand the heat required for the older tissues so a new generation of lower temperature tissue were introduced and presses have changed as well.

    Ian

  4. #14
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    my 2cents:
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    I do a lot of volume mounting. To make it easier, and quicker, I print with a one inch border around the print, and cut the window to expose 1/2 inch, of the paper border. I dry mount them. They are then bagged, to keep them clean. . . .
    For decades I dry mounted and floated photographs in archival hinged mats. Eventually some mount board became slightly discolored around the edges of the prints. Now I either do like Eddie, or hang prints on heavy paper in hinged mats. Hanging the prints has the advantage of leaving remounting options available in the future.

  6. #16

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    I understand the concerns of some collectors and curators in preferring unmounted prints. However, for me, having very precisely trimmed and visible borders is very important, something that just doesn't seem to happen with even quality 4-bladed easels. I, too, float my prints inside the window mat so the edges can be clearly seen. So, I trim and dry-mount. For me, the mount board color is very important, so I like to make that decision as well, and not leave it up to the customer/gallery/etc. I consider the mount board part of the artwork. (BTW, I trim the tissue to the exact size together with the print and have never had bleeding problems. These seem to have been solved long ago.)

    I use Bien Fang (formerly Seal) Buffer Mount, which is reversible with heat, so I (or someone) could remove a print and re-mount it on another board (something I've only done when I made a gross error positioning a print on the board...). However, even if something does happen to the edge of a mount board, it is always covered by the window mat, so the presentation is really not affected unless something happens to the area immediately around the print. I hinge my window mats with linen tape with water-soluble adhesive, so the window mat is easily replaceable at any time. Of course, it should match the mount board.

    No two of my prints are the exact same dimension, so I position each one individually. I usually tack tissue to a batch of prints (40 or so) to opposite corners, and then trim them down to the desired dimensions with a Rototrim rolling trimmer. I then set up to mount. Fortunately for me, my mounting is done in a very dry climate, so I really don't have to worry about drying prints and board that I've had around for a while. I use a self-modified T-square centering device that lets me position in two steps (basically a T-square with a reverse scale on the left part of the "T." I've posted about it somewhere here for those interested).

    I like a little more space below the print than above it, but have a tendency to choose this by feel instead of some formula. I just move the print up from center till it looks "right." I then tack the free corners of the tissue to the board and pop it into the press (after dusting, of course) between two 4-ply rag boards with a sheet of one-ply rag paper covering the print surface. While the print is "cooking," I position and tack the next one. When I'm done tacking the print, it's usually about time to remove the first one from the press. I pull it out, weight it, and put the next print in the press. Repeat till finished

    Best,

    Doremus

    www.DoremusScudder.com

  7. #17
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    I consider the mount board part of the artwork.
    I consider the print unfinished until it is mounted and overmatted, ready for presentation.
    Jim

  8. #18
    ROL
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    Waaayy too much work for me. That's why I use pre-cut overmats sized to float the print in the window. I don't have to measure anything. I don't have to cut any mat board. Well worth the money to have them cut for me.
    Jim

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    Waaayy too much work for me. That's why I use pre-cut overmats sized to float the print in the window. I don't have to measure anything. I don't have to cut any mat board. Well worth the money to have them cut for me.
    Do you use the exact same printing dimensions every time?
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

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