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  1. #1

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    Dry mounting, pre-cut matts, workflow questions.

    I am getting ready to prep my fiber based 10 x 10 and 15 x 15 editions for sale. I have a large 500T mount press and want to figure out how to store prints for sale. Am I best off at least mounting them to board? What kind, thickness? I have also noticed that even though the format is square, some artists are selling them mounted in 18 x 20 matts despite it only being a 10 x 10. It is standard practice to use a longer dimension on the vertical plane and is it typically centered or favoring more matt on the bottom on a square format print?

    My three print sizes for now will mostly be 10 x 10 and 15 x 15 and some 8 x 8's, what is customary in this format and what is the best workflow for editions of 45, printing in quantities of no more than 20 at a time?

  2. #2
    daleeman's Avatar
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    Mounting can be a can of worms. Back at Ohio University in my Hippy days, I was taught to mount above center but never heard the words 1/3rd - 2/3rds. I have often mounted prints, square and not square on boards 2 or 3 sizes up from the long size of the print, i.e. 4x5 on an 11x14 per say.

    I usually put the print image down to protect it on the tissue, use a mechanical pencil without lead to score the tissue real size to the print. I then use a straight edge and razor to cut just inside the line by an 1/8 of an inch or so on all sides. I find some tissues grow in the hot press. I tack the middle then set aside and repeat until all prints have tacked tissue waiting for the layout and heat press.

    Then I find where I want to mount them and mark on the stainless steel T square the tops of the print and bottom for where it goes on the board, slide the T square left to right to see if the image is level. I use a second ruller maked for the left to right. If they are all the same I can wizz through a lot of them very quickly.


    3 corner tack all the prints to the board then use a cover board in the heat press. So I would batch your 10x10, 15x15 and 8x8 to speed up and be consistant.

    Pre-cut mattes are not too bad to match to the mount boards. 4 small light pensil dots of the frame onto the mount board gives you measurements you can use to layout your backing board. So just make certain you keep the overmat matched to the mount board once the print is tacked, else you may find out that not all matts are square and the same.

    Lee

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Most collectors and galleries buying prints prefer un-mounted (as in dry mountyed)and with a good border aroound the image typical 1.25". If the prints are matted then it's to archival standards.

    Whether you present square images in a square frame or rectanle (20x16) is quite a personal choice, there's no right or wrong. My exhibition prints get framed in my 20x16 and larger rectangular frames but I'll often sell individual square prints from 6x6 in square frames (I prefer to print full frame with no cropping).

    Ian

  4. #4

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    Thanks Ian,

    So when you say dry mounting, you are referring to a hinged matt with the print placed into corners holding it in place? And if so, how are you ensuring it being as flat as possible, especially in the case of fiber based papers?

  5. #5

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    daleeman,

    Just saw your post after Ian's, thanks!

  6. #6
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daleeman View Post
    ...I find some tissues grow in the hot press. I tack the middle then set aside and repeat until all prints have tacked tissue waiting for the layout and heat press...Lee
    Actually, the tissue does not grow -- it is the print shrinking as it dries in the mount press -- usually the print will shrink significantly in only one direction. To prevent this, I put the print in the mount press (without the tissue!) Actually due to the high humidity here, I first dry the mat board (after it heats up in the press, I open and close the press several times to drive out the moisture). Then I put the print on the mat board (without tissue) and repeat the above.

    I only tack two adjacent corners of the tissue to the mat board.

    vaughn

    PS -- I prefer to mount square images on vertically orientated mat board.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #7

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    I was taught to dry the print (and flatten it) and the mounting board for a 1/2 minute in the press, allowing it to cool before attaching the mounting tissue and putting it back into the press for another minute.

    I was never a fan of the "mount off center" aesthetic - I center my prints on the board. Square prints are also personal preference - square mats or rectangle - I generally use rectangle because that's the way the precut mat boards and ready made frames come (I guess that I'm lazy).

    I like nice flat prints that don't get damaged, so I dry-mount them. If the galleries don't like matted prints, I suppose my heirs will lose out! Or when they throw out all my stuff they'll have to hire a larger size dumpster.

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
    Thanks Ian,

    So when you say dry mounting, you are referring to a hinged matt with the print placed into corners holding it in place? And if so, how are you ensuring it being as flat as possible, especially in the case of fiber based papers?
    No dry mounting is mounting with heat tissue and is best avoided.

    You can flatten FB prints in a dry mounting press between two bits of mount card, you need to warm them up and dry them out well at the start.

    So yes - I'm referring to a hinged matt with the print placed into corners holding it in place - as the ideal.

    Ian

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    Actually, the tissue does not grow -- it is the print shrinking as it dries in the mount press -- usually the print will shrink significantly in only one direction. To prevent this, I put the print in the mount press (without the tissue!) Actually due to the high humidity here, I first dry the mat board (after it heats up in the press, I open and close the press several times to drive out the moisture). Then I put the print on the mat board (without tissue) and repeat the above.

    I only tack two adjacent corners of the tissue to the mat board.

    vaughn

    PS -- I prefer to mount square images on vertically orientated mat board.
    Pendantics - if dry mounting tissue's cut to the print size it bleeds out.

    Ian

  10. #10
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Pendantics - if dry mounting tissue's cut to the print size it bleeds out.

    Ian
    Interesting -- decades of dry-mounting and I never have had that happen. But I have always used Seal products.

    And since I "float" the print inside the window, I would have seen it.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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