Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,302   Posts: 1,536,188   Online: 666
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,637
    Images
    40
    Require a non-refundable deposit?
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #12
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    While I'm sure everyone is acting with good intentions (), I don't envy your circumstance. One thing that concerns me is the number of intermediaries, particularly the designer. My experience with interior designers is that they can be problematic. While they may certainly help you get your work out by promoting and exposing it, they rather notoriously expect to buy your work at huge discounts, and will resell it to their clients at a huge markup. This can be worse than it at first seems if the client likes your work, and doesn't realize that buying direct or from your agent may be more reasonable than the invoice from the designer suggests. Ahem...


    ...but you probably shouldn't let that stop you.

  3. #13
    Barry S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    DC Metro
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,252
    Images
    31
    The art advisor takes a 20% commission, which she said will be split with the interior designer. I was under the impression there would be no further markup, and my invoice would go to the client--but who knows? The bottom line for me is the net amount I receive, but I'm trying to sell at consistent prices. The galleries I've worked with take a 20-50% commission, so this is a good deal. The art advisor seems like a nice person who genuinely likes my work, so I'd like to be considered as easy to work with, and not make things too complicated.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    148
    Jeez, make the prints already. If they don't want them, chock it up to the CODB.

    To the rest- Restocking fee? Nonrefundable deposit? for an 8x10?

    I have had this happen to me before and there ended up being a lot of 000's at the end. Why would anyone buy something they couldn't see first? A lot of bad advice here. Worst case scenario, you have the prints to sell to someone else. Go ahead and do it.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Jersey Channel Islands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    326
    For Special order custom printing I require a 25% non returnable deposit to cover my material costs and the time involved in making the prints, this is non negotiable, if they wish to view already made prints I need the full purchase price which is returnable upon the prints being returned undamaged, and if I am asked to take and print a specific photograph for a client then I charge a 50% deposit, I do not think this is unreasonable with the time and costs of materials involved for what is today a very special service, and I have never been turned down.
    Richard

  6. #16
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,804
    I did much of the publicity photography for a college. An assortment of 8x10 prints of an event would be submitted the next day on spec to the PR department. They took what they needed at $1 per print (this was decades ago) and I still have hundreds of rejects. This system was profitable for me and efficient for the PR department.

    If I was Barry, I'd submit three finished prints to the client. If they are rejected, he will have three quality prints that should find a good home eventually. If they are accepted, the clients and intermediaries have good reason to appreciate his business style. There are other ways to conduct business, but not for me.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,152
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    1
    hi barry

    make the prints, and don't worry about it.
    make sure you charge a fair amount for your time and effort.

    if you have similar work ( tonally &c ) you could always show them those photographs
    and say theirs will be custom made and have a similar tonal pallet ...
    if they say go ahead, make them ...

    congratulations + good luck !
    john
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  8. #18
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,210
    Images
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    make the prints, and don't worry about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    If I was Barry, I'd submit three finished prints to the client. If they are rejected, he will have three quality prints that should find a good home eventually. If they are accepted, the clients and intermediaries have good reason to appreciate his business style.
    I agree.

    I'd recommend not to rush. Take the necessary time to make prints that meet your standards, but start immediately. Perhaps you already have done the prints by the time you read this.

    I'd actually prefer to deliver before being paid because then I won't be under pressure to produce (which might lead to inferior printing).

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    704
    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    While I'm sure everyone is acting with good intentions (), I don't envy your circumstance. One thing that concerns me is the number of intermediaries, particularly the designer. My experience with interior designers is that they can be problematic. While they may certainly help you get your work out by promoting and exposing it, they rather notoriously expect to buy your work at huge discounts, and will resell it to their clients at a huge markup. This can be worse than it at first seems if the client likes your work, and doesn't realize that buying direct or from your agent may be more reasonable than the invoice from the designer suggests. Ahem...


    ...but you probably shouldn't let that stop you.
    One of my side projects is a software developer. We have a product that is useful for land surveyors, civil engineers and the like. We do sell direct to the customer, but we also have resellers of our software. We do give rather large discounts to the resellers, but we have found that we make more money by selling through the resellers than by selling direct to the customers because the volume of sales is much higher. I see absolutely nothing wrong with going through an intermediary to get the sale, if that's the way the client wants to handle it.

    I do also think that a small deposit to cover cost of materials is not out of line, though it is likely that you would sell the prints eventually anyway.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin