Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,986   Posts: 1,523,992   Online: 806
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,917

    Color of matting for brown toned images

    I am fully aware this is "it's all what you like" and "it depends".... but I would still like to solicit opinions.

    I usually use a mat color called "Pearl white" from Frame Destinations (one of APUG sponsors). This color is more of a creamy off white which looks white by itself more or less, but against true white, it's definitely cream. I like using this one because with normal B&W image without toning or with light selenium toning, it brings out the white in the image and also the black. Visually, it adds "pop" to the image.

    HOWEVER, I have an image that majority of the part is toned in deep brown with some near the center toned in selenium. I covered parts with rubber cement and toned in brown so it's not really a split toning or double toning but it's more of one part brown and another part selenium. With this image, this mat color didn't work so well. The mat looks a lot darker in cream than usual, and it doesn't help bring out the brown in the image. It sort of blends into the image rather than enhancing it.

    Under these conditions, would you (personally) think pure white or white would work better? I typically don't like to use pure white because when combined with un-toned or selenium toned image, it's too stalk (sp) and I like warmer presentation. But I think it backfired on me this time.

    By the way, the molding is metal matte black.

    Again, I'm just interested in YOUR opinion either theoretically or from experience. I'm in uncharted territory for me. I could use help here. Thanks.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #2
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,206
    Images
    63
    There are a lot of different whites in mat board. I generally use something that is designated "natural white." It's not that glaring ultra white, but isn't too far toward the creamy side. But then, I've not done exactly the toning you're describing either.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,917
    It's amazing how many WHITE there are in matting materials...... you are right.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    775
    Images
    28
    I use an off-white for brown. It's a good transition into that tone and isn't too harsh. I also use it for warm-toned prints. It's a Peterboro PW572. You can go a little more "off" into a beige too and it works really well -that's what I use for my brown/walnut/cedar frames. For straight black and white that are selenium toned to a cool colour, I use a bright white PW521 Peterboro in a black frame. I know this doesn't necessarily apply to your scenario, but maybe you're thinking aobut it wrong. I like to draw the viewer in rather than pop the image out. It's my own preference to stick match with base tint rather than contrast. The image feels more as belonging to the frame rather than escaping it....if that makes any sense.

  5. #5
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Elk, California
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    2,479
    Images
    33
    I use the mat called Westminster Bright White rag board, it is not actually as bright as a paper mat white and it looks great and neutral/warm. I tried the natural white, but it kind of looks a sickly yellow and distracting when you see it on the gallery wall.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  6. #6
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,624
    Images
    40
    The board from the Light Impression of old was great -- I used Bright White for all my silver gelatin work -- including the Portriga Rapid (lightly selenium toned).

    But their Natural White was great for my platinums and warm carbon prints. A perfect clean-looking light cream.

    Another company's "Natural White" (don't know who), is way too yellow -- closer to what I have seen as "Antique White". I should have bought a sampler before buying 10 full (32x40) sheets of 8-ply of it! As Jon mentioned, a little sickly-looking. But I have used it for some very warm images (like the salt print I recently made) and it looks fine. And I will use it to re-mat the two Watkins 16x20 prints I have -- the color will work well with old albuman prints (bad spelling!).

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,917
    Hum....

    This is going to be more difficult than I thought.... I remembered I had a mat board that is less creamy than the one I had so I went ahead and made a cut. The new board is more of a neutral white. Not the bright white but not so creamy as before - not that the board #1 was all that creamy to begin with.

    It made a difference. The shade of "white" is so close that if I am not seeing them side by side, I won't be able to tell them apart but what a difference when combined with my print. The image came little more forward. It shows better. Before, I got the feeling, the image was "behind" the mat board little too far.

    BUT, it's not quite right, yet. I'm not sure how to go about this either. I won't know until I put it together. I have a collection of L samples but it won't even come close to giving me the right impression.

    Thanks everybody.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,917
    Have any of you experienced the difference in shade of "white" from same company, same board, but different lot? That may be part of my problem. The original board is my standard selection. But this particular one seems to be a tad darker than what I used to get.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,917
    Quote Originally Posted by jordanstarr View Post
    I use an off-white for brown. It's a good transition into that tone and isn't too harsh. I also use it for warm-toned prints. It's a Peterboro PW572. You can go a little more "off" into a beige too and it works really well -that's what I use for my brown/walnut/cedar frames. For straight black and white that are selenium toned to a cool colour, I use a bright white PW521 Peterboro in a black frame. I know this doesn't necessarily apply to your scenario, but maybe you're thinking aobut it wrong. I like to draw the viewer in rather than pop the image out. It's my own preference to stick match with base tint rather than contrast. The image feels more as belonging to the frame rather than escaping it....if that makes any sense.

    Thanks. It's entirely possible my approach is wrong. As I had it before, I had a distinct feeling there was a mat board and the image was inside it, sort of like an inch or so behind the board. The image was too far behind. In reality, it's just a 4 ply board so it's about 1/16" behind the board. It's the impression I had. When I used the board #2 which is less creamy, the image came little more forward.

    You say, you draw your viewer INTO the image rather than to have the image pop out at the viewer. Do you care to elaborate on this, please if you would? Seems your approach is exact opposite of mine, so I'm curious.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #10
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,126
    Images
    12
    What about something cool blue/green to be complementary with the brown toning?

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin