Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,915   Posts: 1,556,331   Online: 1020
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14

Thread: Numbers...

  1. #11
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The Armpit of Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,295
    Images
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    .... and you should be getting a higher success rate than 1 good image every 4-7 rolls of film.

    I know how to pretty much nail my exposures with an in camera meter of course, and for my manual cameras I'm getting better. I always try to mentally figure it out before using my incident meter, or another camera.

    But what I meant is that if you usually use 7 rolls of 120 for a client session to photograph different poses or locations, do you cover the cost of those 7 rolls by your session fee, or by print sales? Some people use the session fee to only cover their time, and if you're using 7 rolls of film and the client only buys one 8x10 then you're actually loosing money...



    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The secret is getting good negatives by good control over exposure and development, it's not difficult but a little effort to nail your personal EI's and Dev timses for one film under various conditions means you can concentrate on the photography knowing once capture you can get excellent prints.

    Ian

    I had done this with TriX to a degree that I could get predictable results, but ever since the big news I've been intent on moving to Ilford films and chemicals. I dont see any point in continuing my efforts to learn the nuances of Kodak stuff if there's no guarantee it will be around for any further extended period of time.

  2. #12
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,770
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    There are a variety of ways to price things.

    Professional Photographers of America publishes much current info, mostly for portrait and wedding studios but a reasonable guide.

    Typically prices are determined by a ratio related to "cost of goods sold" (COGS) based on what successful studios do. For film based work 30% COGS is normal. (For digital studios, 20% is a normal COGS number, digital doesn't really cost less, depreciation is 10% greater.)

    So, if the cost of your labor and materials for production is $30 a sales price of $100 is normal.

    So for a sitting/session with proofs it will cost me about $30 per roll; film, postage, developing, proofs, and scans. So my rate is $100/roll that I shoot.

    Prints, same basic deal. Labor plus materials is 30% of the sales price regardless of print size.

    My labor costs (for pricing) are based on market rates for the work involved. For me that means simply "what it would cost me to hire the same work done at a high quality lab". Doesn't matter if I'm personally slower or faster doing the same work.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,577
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post
    I know how to pretty much nail my exposures with an in camera meter of course, and for my manual cameras I'm getting better. I always try to mentally figure it out before using my incident meter, or another camera.

    But what I meant is that if you usually use 7 rolls of 120 for a client session to photograph different poses or locations, do you cover the cost of those 7 rolls by your session fee, or by print sales? Some people use the session fee to only cover their time, and if you're using 7 rolls of film and the client only buys one 8x10 then you're actually loosing money...
    I had done this with TriX to a degree that I could get predictable results, but ever since the big news I've been intent on moving to Ilford films and chemicals. I dont see any point in continuing my efforts to learn the nuances of Kodak stuff if there's no guarantee it will be around for any further extended period of time.
    Price your session fee to match your typical costs. If you will typically use 3 rolls, base your materials cost calculations on that.

    In most cases, if you need 7 rolls it will be because there are more than the usual number of good things happening in a session, not more problems, so print sales are likely to be better.

    And I would suggest staying with the materials that you are still learning. If you develop the ability to attain good, repeatable results with Tri-X, it will be much easier for you to transition to HP-5 Plus.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,676
    Images
    14
    For gallery Prints consider this


    Gallery will take 50 % you will be required in most cases to provide image and frame.

    If you are selling a image in a 30 x40 frame for $1500

    then you will recieve $750

    minus the cost of print and frame lets be super conservative and say $300

    therefore the gallery recieves $750 - they handle the rented space, marketing and bring the client list
    you recieve $450 - supplying the framed pieces


    If you do not like this arrangement of funds up the price of your work and do the math.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin