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  1. #31

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    For those of you who use rubber stamps, what kind of ink do you use that is archival, acid free, etc?

  2. #32

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    I may be in the process of selling my first print. My dad said I should make sure to include some copyright notice on it, and I remembered this thread. So I am looking at the stamps at Superior, but they seem to all include the year on them. Is that necessary? I don't want to have to get a new one every year.

  3. #33
    roteague's Avatar
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    I only sell matted prints, so this isn't an issue for me. My mats always include my signature.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  4. #34
    Thomas Wagner's Avatar
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    I gave up rubber stamps and changed to avery lables when some of my prints got stacked. The stamp ink transfered to the picture below, ruined the whole series...

    Tom
    I was going to try pornography, but could not find any used pornographs

  5. #35

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    I hate to flog a dead horse... but I still have some trouble stamping the backs of my dry mounted prints. I have "real" rubber stamp, and have been using the Rexton ink & rejuvinator. Now I don't use it all the time, in fact a couple months may go by without stamping a print. Then when I do, the pad has completely dried out. I suppose the solvents used in the ink & rejuvinator are what make it dry out quickly, and not smudge adjacent prints (however I am careful to keep them apart). Also, the stamp/ink are not very consistent in how well they print, probably due to the pad always drying out.

    I do like the looks of the stamp when it turns out right, but a more consistent method would be great. Now that I am getting closer to having to re-order more ink, I am wondering if I should use a different ink, by labels or keep with what I have been using?

    Someone out there must have had this problem with the Rexton inks, and found a solution.

    rexp
    Those who don't think Photographers have the skills of REAL artists such as painters obviously have not had to spot my prints.

  6. #36
    Gay Larson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rexp View Post
    Well... I fell for it. Drew up & ordered a stamp. Bought some Rexton ink and a dry pad. The stamp came today, and I am less than pleased. The stamp is made of a clear material, and if I am not mistaken the ink makes the stamp sticky. Really bad job of stamping. I should have SPECIFICALLY ASKED for the old 'red rubber' type of stamp. But then I didn't expect anything else.

    grrrr
    That sticky stamp pad is made for embossing as in scrapbooking or cardmaking, I have one. I don't know what kind of ink or stamp pad you should use but would also be interested to know. Sorry I only use my stamp pads for cardmaking and would love to know if they can be used on the back of my prints.
    Prints available in the APUG GAllery
    www.gaylarsonphotography.com

  7. #37
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Well I'm a rubber stamp manufacturer!

    I actually manufacture rubber, not polymer stamps. There isn't much difference in the products these days, except when you wish to use quick drying inks often, or for long periods.

    Natural rubber is obviously the best, except it is anything except natural, well it's as natural as the rubber tyres on your cars.

    Almost all inks in rubber stamp land I know of, are one of two types. Water based and solvent (or oil) based.

    Basically the ink is water with a dye in it. The water is the carrier, the dye is the colour.

    When you stamp a piece of paper the carrier dries into the substrate, which is the paper, leaving the dye on top. You have a rubber stamp inpression which looks good but may run when the image gets wet. Not always but often.

    With non porous material, stamping gets a bit iffy, to say the least. Non porous material is any surface that is sealed from the outside world.

    Resin Coated (RC) paper used in bucket loads of darkrooms and AFAIK, in all commercial colour paper processes, is a non porous surface.

    What is required is an ink with a high solvent content, generally these inks are oil based. The carrier in this case is the solvent base, which by the way, evaporates very quickly when it hits the atmosphere.

    Basically when the impression is made, the solvent, depending on it's makeup, evaporates reasonably quickly and leaves the pigment dye on the surface. Basically I liken it to a type of house paint in the way it works and sticks to anything it touches.

    I myself don't think (in this day and age) that rubber stamps are that great for the back of RC prints. That said, I do use rubber stamps for the back of all of my RC prints.

    When it comes to stamp pads for the use of quick drying inks, the best in the world is made in Japan. It's an Artline product and the pad size is 65x103mm of which about 55x93mm is actually really usable. This pad comes with it's own airtight snap lid with a rubber seal all around.

    The pad is called, Pad HI-SEAL EAGU-3 This is the smaller of two available. As it's so expensive I wouldn't worry about the larger version. My Guestimation is that this pad would probably retail in the USA between $25 - $60 USD

    The ink designed for these pads is also called HI-SEAL and it comes in a 55ml glass bottle. The screw cap has an applicator attached, which is a bit of wood and a brush at the end. Like glue bottles we have here. This ink is called, ink HI-SEAL ESSG-1.

    Superior rubber stamp and seal company in the USA, is a reputable marking device manufacturer, which is what they are called in the USA. You may wish to look at Millenium Marking as well.

    The biggest manufacturer of inks for all sorts of applications like this, is in Germany. The company is Noris inks. Noris make almost every conceivable ink, they really do it well.

    If you wish to rejuvenate a crudded up ink pad which is full of quick drying ink, try Isopropyl Alcohol. This will be heaps cheaper than any manufacturers product and I would guess, probably do as good, if not better job. It's what I use!

    Mick.

  8. #38
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    There is another method of leaving your mark on a print, use an embossing machine to emboss a neat impression on a corner of your print.

    You can emboss it on the edge or on the image, works both ways. This is an increasing way, commercial photographers seem to be marking their work.

    They don't tell me this, I just see what goes through the factory. I have one of these myself, why wouldn't I!

    Mick.
    Last edited by Mick Fagan; 02-05-2007 at 02:14 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Addition

  9. #39
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    To add to Mick's comments -

    As a professional engineer, I sometimes have to seal documents. The best solution is a compression seal that embosses the document, but on occasion I am asked to use a rubber stamp facsimile of my seal on original drawings so that the seal will reproduce when the drawings are copied. If the drawings are on plastic rather than paper (which is pretty common today), conventional stamp pad inks won't work. Several years ago I got a bottle of a special ink made specifically for this purpose. It worked, but - - - the stuff takes forever (like hours) to dry and smudges terribly until it is thoroughly dry, and the pigment in the ink clogs up the stamp.

    For my photographs, I choose to use an Avery adhesive label. I have a copyright notice, and leave a space to write in the year so that the requirement that a year be stated is met. I apply this to the back of the mount, not to the image itself.

    I also have a Chinese chop along with the traditional red cinebar ink. Sometimes I will place on the back of a print, but like the inks designed for plastic materials, the drying time is pretty long. So instead I have a scanned version that I print on the Avery label with my copyright notice.
    Louie

  10. #40

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    Thanks Mick - I am only interested in stamping the back of the mount, so putting ink on an RC surface isn't a problem. If I remember correctly, I purchased my stamp from Superior, and it is the pinkish-red colored rubber. The pad was purchased from Porter's Camera, and came with the Rexton ink. This is a solvent based ink, which dries quite fast - I have not had any problems with smudging. My problem seems to be keeping the pad from drying out (even when bagged). I suppose a higher quality pad that seals itself might help.

    I appreciate the responses...
    Those who don't think Photographers have the skills of REAL artists such as painters obviously have not had to spot my prints.

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