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  1. #1
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    dry mounting using an iron

    .....your thoughts on it, feasible? I've no dry mount press and I do not forsee one in the future, funds are quite limited these days, frustratingly so.....

  2. #2
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    yes, for small prints if you're careful. I wouldn't use it for work I was selling though.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #3

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    Use the very lowest setting (silk) on the iron. At one time people did this routinely.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #4
    ann
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    I did it many years ago, nothing larger than 8x10 and used a piece of "kraft " paper on top of the print for protection.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  5. #5
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    I've done it and, if done carefully, it works.

    I've also burned a few prints doing it that way.

    Set the iron on "low." If it is a steam iron (most are, these days) be sure there is no water in the tank. Dry iron only.
    Cover the print with a piece of clean paper to protect the surface. Use even pressure and keep the iron moving but not too fast.

    Practice on a few scrap prints until you get the hang of it.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #6
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    Thanks all.....glad to know some have done it successfully.

  7. #7

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    As noted above already, it's certainly feasible. It just requires a lot more time and diligence.

    With a meat thermometer I found the setting at which the iron was a maximum of 180 deg. F., made a mark with a sharpie at that point on the dial for later use. No water in the iron of course. At first I tried paper between the iron and the print, but found that this was prone to leaving crease marks on the print at the edges of the iron. Switching to archival mat board as a buffer solved that. Work carefully from one iron's section to the next, making sure you leave the iron pressed to the area long enough that all four layers (mat, dry mount tissue, print, buffer mat) reach the required temperature.

    It's time consuming, and you do have to be careful, but it does work.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by aarontalcott View Post
    As noted above already, it's certainly feasible. It just requires a lot more time and diligence.

    With a meat thermometer I found the setting at which the iron was a maximum of 180 deg. F., made a mark with a sharpie at that point on the dial for later use. No water in the iron of course. At first I tried paper between the iron and the print, but found that this was prone to leaving crease marks on the print at the edges of the iron. Switching to archival mat board as a buffer solved that. Work carefully from one iron's section to the next, making sure you leave the iron pressed to the area long enough that all four layers (mat, dry mount tissue, print, buffer mat) reach the required temperature.

    It's time consuming, and you do have to be careful, but it does work.
    I'll second this method.

  9. #9
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    In the years before I could afford a dry mounting press, I routinely mounted 20" x 16" using an iron. As others have stated, iron should not be too hot, you need to keep it flat and you just need to take it slow and have a board with some books ready (you need to remember that the way the tissue works in that the heat activates it but the permanent bond is formed as the tissue cools).

    I used to use silicon release paper between the print surface and the iron. Work your way from the center outwards and as soon as you have finished, cover with an archival board and place a good weight (four or five photographic monograph books should do the trick) and then leave it to cool for 30 minutes.

    It takes a bit of practice but can work very well.

    Best,

    David
    www.dsallen.de

  10. #10

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    As usual, David, you have told us exactly what we all needed to know! One question: is it necessary to make sure the mounting board is completely moisture-free (e.g. by ironing it separately), before proceeding with the mounting itself? Otherwise I can imagine the whole thing curling as it dries.

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