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Thread: Framing 22x30

  1. #1
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Framing 22x30

    So I've got this idea that involves printing small on to a full Imperial sheet of Platine, 22x30 inches in size. What size of matte and frame for the whole sheet? Beuller?

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    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I'd float mount it in a deep box frame (say 1 1/2 inches deep), no mat, use a dark contrasting background mount board, and go with something like a 24"x32" or 26" x 36" frame.

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    ROL
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    I present 24"x30" (4:5 prints) at 32"x40", so anything within an inch or two of that would suit my sensibilities, if not yours.


    Landscape 24"x30" (32"x40") flanked by two portrait 20"x24" (28"x34"). Sorry for the oblique view:
    Last edited by ROL; 07-05-2013 at 02:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Anodized black aluminum frame, water-white glass (this stuff is incredible for getting rid of reflections and uv, and it's cheaper than museum plexi), 8 ply mat (or maybe even 8 and 4 layered, flush with each other, not inset, so it gives the illusion of a 12 ply, when done well this looks fantastic...I would say a 6 inch border on all sides, so in a 34x42" frame.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    My dad just had an opening in Atlanta, and the gallery used the above mentioned water-white glass and 8+4ply combo to frame the work. The prints are all roughly 40x54 inches.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

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    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Depending on the images, I would think about just a 22x30 frame, no window mat.

    or 24x32 and float the paper inside the frame, again, no window mat.

    For both, either image against the glass, or some sort of spacer to keep the image and the paper it is on away from the glass.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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    fdi
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    You probably noticed a wide variety of answers. It really comes down to what you like. If you observe a 8x10 picture in a simple 8x10 frame it has more of a snap shot look. An 8x10 print with a nice mat in an 11x14 frame or even a 16x20 frame will have significantly more presence. For a larger image, an alternative is float mounting it in a frame that is just a little larger, say 23x31, but deeper like a shadow box frame. The later requires what is typically a custom spacer though. If you want the frame to protect the image over time you do not want it against the glass so you will need a mat or spacer. The clasic gallery style photo framing consists of a simple black frame with a white mat. For an image that size I would suggest you go with at least 3 inches but 4 or 5 inches as shown in ROL's example photo will give it more of a gallery feel. Of course, larger mat means larger frame, glass and backing so more money.



 

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