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Thread: Signing prints

  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walbergb View Post
    Thank you all for your comments. I do dry mount my prints (on acid-free foam board), and overlap the print border with the mat. It is the print border that shows and not the backing board. Perhaps with glossy prints I can change that practice.
    What is the importance of having the signature show on the front?
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    What is the importance of having the signature show on the front?
    None, I guess. I've never been formally schooled in signing prints, so I instinctively copied what I was exposed to. On the other hand, I was recently talking to a former professional photographer friend of mine, and he recommended signing on the back of the print in the border and away from the image.
    Bob Walberg

    The fix is in!

  3. #13

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    Walberg - I'm probably opening another can of worms here, but I wouldn't dry mount to any kind of foam board. I have seen the board collapse, or compress in areas, which can be seen viewing the print. I've also seen foam core do this in sections, if the heat in the dry mounting process is too high (or long, or pressure too much).
    Why do you mount to foam board, anyway, just curious?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    Walberg - I'm probably opening another can of worms here, but I wouldn't dry mount to any kind of foam board. I have seen the board collapse, or compress in areas, which can be seen viewing the print. I've also seen foam core do this in sections, if the heat in the dry mounting process is too high (or long, or pressure too much).
    Why do you mount to foam board, anyway, just curious?
    You can buy self-adhesive foam board, so why would you want to use the archaic process of dry mounting?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

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  5. #15
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    To each their own regarding dry mounting, but I always refer back to the photography conservationist I had a conversation with. Her name is Patty Landres, and works/workes at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. When I first started seriously photographing, and asked her advice for mounting my prints, she very assertively exclaimed the following: "Whatever you do, do NOT dry mount your photographs. Ever".
    And then began to explain to me what a pain in the neck it is to try to save a print where something had happened to the board the print was mounted to. You may draw your own conclusions, but I don't think advice gets more expert than that.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    Walberg - I'm probably opening another can of worms here, but I wouldn't dry mount to any kind of foam board. I have seen the board collapse, or compress in areas, which can be seen viewing the print. I've also seen foam core do this in sections, if the heat in the dry mounting process is too high (or long, or pressure too much).
    Why do you mount to foam board, anyway, just curious?
    Why use foamboard? I'm assuming your question is getting at the medium (foamboard versus mounting board) and not the method. Two articles (Advances in Archival Mounting and Storage by Michael A. Smith and ‘Inherent Vice’ and Quality A Photograph Conservator’s View by Barbara E. Lemmen) played a big role in my decision. I get the ArtCare Archival Foamboard through a local framing shop. Controlling the entire process from taking the shot to mounting the print is a hobby for me. My prints are not destined for a museum or for profit. They are destined for my pleasure and the pleasure of friends and family and the occasional art gallery supporter who is willing to support the gallery by buying one of my prints. I donate a print, and the gallery sells it in an auction as a fundraiser. It's my way of donating to the gallery.

    As for your concerns, they are valid, and I have taken measures to avoid such problems. Besides using archival foamboard, I have refurbished my drymount press so the temperature is quite accurate and the pressure is minimal and uniform. I have never had the foamboard fail.
    Bob Walberg

    The fix is in!

  7. #17

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    It's your print, you are the artist, sign it any darn place you want any way that works.

    I sign mine with fine point Sharpie on the lower right, with a title on the lower left, just in the white space outside the picture area. If someone thinks that gouche, well, tough noogies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    To each their own regarding dry mounting, but I always refer back to the photography conservationist I had a conversation with. Her name is Patty Landres, and works/workes at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. When I first started seriously photographing, and asked her advice for mounting my prints, she very assertively exclaimed the following: "Whatever you do, do NOT dry mount your photographs. Ever".
    And then began to explain to me what a pain in the neck it is to try to save a print where something had happened to the board the print was mounted to. You may draw your own conclusions, but I don't think advice gets more expert than that.

    Thats what I was taught by my photography professor. Do not do anything that can not be undone. Never dry mount ,and sign with a pencil rather then a pen, referring to fiber based prints. For RC prints I would think a pen would be ok because it is coated and not likely to bleed. Signing and titling the print on the bottom white border was acceptable, but it really a matter of personal preference. If you photograph is strong enough signing it isn't distracting. I would worry more about un spotted dust spots or someones hair getting trapped between the print and the glass, now that is distracting.

  9. #19

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    Linen hinges. That or supply your mounter with reversible mounting sheets; almost all "professional" framers have only the permanent kind. I sign on the front with an extra fine Sharpie and have yet to see any bleed or creep. (I may come to regret using that.) I also sign in very soft pencil in the middle of the print's back. No problems there either.
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

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