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  1. #21
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    there's always Diasec...face mount to plexi with a backing of anodized aluminum...
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  2. #22

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    As usual, this thread has become a potpourri of misinformation. Yeah, MDF and masonite if you're selling someone a print intended to hang next
    to their Elvis rug in the trailer house, preferably under the roof leak so the inevitable discoloration of the print can get blamed on something
    other than the hokey method by which it was mounted in the first place. ... Then the other extreme... face mounting on aluminum, which if
    properly done means the framing per se for a single print will probably more than the camera which took it. There are all kinds of options, but
    they are certainly not all equal by any means, either in elegance or "archival" properties (or in some of the above suggestions, "anti-archival"
    properties).

  3. #23
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    How is a range of options misinformation? If you have a great print and the buyer wants it to look the best, why forego the best possible presentation (as long as it suits that particular image)?

    As an aside, when I frame my work, I hinge mount with archival tape to acid/lignin free mountboard, 8 ply window mat cut to be exactly .25 inches larger than the actual image dimension on all sides. I dislike attaching prints to alternative substrates with the exception of face mounting for aesthetic reasons.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  4. #24

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    Hmmm . . . anti-archival . . . this could be a sort of punk trend? Self-consuming photography? Ephemeral images, that are somewhat more ephemeral than usual . . . Not sure how it would sell in the galleries though. Mind you, a big chunk of masonite could always be repurposed to fix the trailer roof.

    I vaguely recall someone trying to make a big montage print on a sunlit wall in a gallery, which was supposed to decay and degrade over the course of the exhibition and that it was quite difficult to achieve in a predictable way. Then there have been several of the projects of JR, with the degradation of the substrate, rather than the image itself, being part of some sort of entropy aesthetic.

    All possibly quite interesting - but to make your work rot by accident, not design, seems somehow less sensible.

  5. #25
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Does this count?

    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  6. #26

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    drew
    maybe you should keep your misinformed opinions to yourself
    none of the prints i have sold this way or similar ways
    are hanging next to an elvis rug in a trailer ...
    the nonsense you spout is pretty entertaining ...
    especially since your cprints are anything but archival

  7. #27
    AgX
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    This thread made me realize that I never ever came across Masonite.

  8. #28

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    Oh, I don't intend to offend anyone .... the less "archival" the mounting is, that will just thin out the mountain of ugly oversized Fauxtoshopped inkjet prints the next generation has to figure out how to get rid of. But Chris - facemounting done right can be lovely. It's just kinda ironic
    in a thread advocating acidic, formaldehye-fumey, sulphur-speckled pulp-wood mounting. I did quite a bit of facemounting at one time, and
    it was a minimum thousand dollar upcharge per print. With today's optically-coated plexi, I'd realistically want double that upcharge for even
    a moderate sized prints. Really big spliced ones can cost tens of thousands of dollars to mount that way. But I don't print billboard-sized stuff
    myself. Never will.

  9. #29
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    Update from original post. Print is 10" X 60" and was mounted on a box made of 1X4 lumber and masonite. Sides painted black. Print stuck to box with either a gloss or mat medium (Golden) and then weighted down to dry. Looks great. Was not intended to be archival. If it lasts 20 to 30 years it will outlast me. It is a piece in a show to give context to the other work. There will be two other similar presentations in the show. I will try to remember to post images here. Bill Barber
    Last edited by nsurit; 03-14-2014 at 11:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #30

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    Just as long as folks understand important distinctions. Our company here does cut down thousands of pieces of Masonite Duolux (the smoothest variety) a year - entire pallet loads - for a particular photographic interest/event. But this is a temporary event, and they do things totally different for any museum collection. And they also put a little slip of Saran Wrap or some other plastic between the print and the masonite. Some of the nasties of these kinds of boards can be sealed in with true shellac, but that kinda defeats the ability of water-based glues to soak in too.

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