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  1. #1

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    Embossing stamp for matte boards

    Does anybody know the best people to approach to get a stamp made with which I can emboss a matte board? Would I approach a jeweller or a machinist?

    I would like to "punch" a bas relief signature or logo into the matte boards of my framed prints, but don't know the first thing about obtaining one of these personalised punches.

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  2. #2
    BarrieB's Avatar
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    When I worked in a Bank years ago the Manager had a SEAL like you mentioned which he put over his signature to avoid the document being copied; Try a 'Quality Stationery supplier.

  3. #3
    rbarker's Avatar
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    I'd talk to matte board manufacturer or a large-scale print shop that handles commercial brochures and such, Graeme. Embossing dies (made in a matching pair) are often used on heavy cover stock and such. Whether they would work on matte board is the question. The last time I explored that option for printing, a set of dies cost several hundred dollars. There may be alternate methods that would work better for matte boards, and less expensively, too.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  4. #4
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    A chemically engraved embossing die can be had from dies shops that service the printing industry. You could mount the metal plate to a thick handle with some good epoxy, backing it up with sufficient support, so you can use a small hammer on the other end to strike the image into the paper. Or you could look for something similar to the notarys embosser that the die can be mounted in. If you use a great many it may be worth contacting a printer that does embossing to see about having them do it for you, the quality of the work will be much higher.
    Gary Beasley

  5. #5
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Although the sound of the dull thuds probably hasn't reached Oz yet, Graeme, a couple of additional thoughts stuck me.

    Woodworker supply houses often list a heat-based marking tool that is somewhat like the old-style wooden-handled soldering irons for labeling furniture pieces and such. The end of the tool has a small, flat plate that has the craftsperson's personalized logo (or whatever), and essentially wood-burns that into the wooden object.

    You might also explore "foil stamping" as an alternative. A Google search will turn up various references.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  6. #6
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Traditional foil stamping involves the use of a flat dies similar to the embossing die. The foil is pressed between the heated die and the paper surface and the foil, under pressure and with the right amount of heat, is transferred to the paper. It can be tricky to make it work on rough surfaces. One the other hand the foil can be used with a heated stylus to mark paper by hand, a woodburning pen with a rounded nib works well.
    Gary Beasley

  7. #7

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    I started thinking about this a few months ago after seeing somebody putting something similar on their mattes in an exhibition. I saw the same thing again on the matte of an 80 year old framed print a couple of weeks ago, so I thought it might be a simple thing to find some sort of punch to which my logo could be attached.

    There is some good leads to follow so far, but I'm sure we haven't reached the answer yet. A chemically engraved steel stamp sounds like what I'm after. I could press the image into the matte board with that.

    And I thought those dull thuds were the sound of my own thoughts trying to get out of my thick skull. It makes me feel so much more comfortable to hear they were yours Ralph. You must have big thoughts for me to hear them all the way over here!
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  8. #8
    argentic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    Does anybody know the best people to approach to get a stamp made with which I can emboss a matte board? Would I approach a jeweller or a machinist?

    I would like to "punch" a bas relief signature or logo into the matte boards of my framed prints, but don't know the first thing about obtaining one of these personalised punches.

    Cheers,
    I made my own emboss stamp from a large stainless bolt with a nice flat head. I carved my logo in it with a dremel and a very fine diamond milling cutter. Now I stamp all my fiber prints with it in the lower right or lefthand corner. A light blow with a small heavy hammer, and some rubber under the print is enough to make a classy indelible mark. Still the emboss stamp is only visible by side lighting. When looking straight at the photograph you just don't see it. This solution makes a unique and indelible mark on the front of the print without interfering with the image.

    I guess it would work on matte board too.
    Wilbert
    http://www.photovergne.com
    Cours photo en Auvergne

  9. #9
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    I started thinking about this a few months ago after seeing somebody putting something similar on their mattes in an exhibition.
    It sounds like it would be quite unique. I may have to look out for something like this.

    In the meantime, there is a photographer in Swan Hill, Victoria that uses a small brass plate etched with his name, that is mounted on the frame itself. You might look into using something like that. Here is a link to a page that shows what his looks like: http://www.nalderphotographics.com/framing.asp. I've been to his gallery and like the way these look.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  10. #10

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    I had a couple embossing plates made for a portfolio cover used for a local cathedral. They were made through Zetta Florence here in Melbourne and weren't too dear in price. Phillip is the owner and best contact guy. Hope this might help.
    http://www.zettaflorence.com/

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