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  1. #21
    Rafal Lukawiecki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
    Now I am looking at Logan mat cutter prices, any recomendations on which one? lol!
    PKM-25, unless you are experienced or gifted when it comes to sizing board and cutting mats, I'd suggest you steer clear of the simpler, hobby-style cutters, and get a professional one, just as you have done going for a pro press. If your eyes are set on a Logan, the only one I'd consider is 850 Platinum Edge Pro. I know it, but I don't use it. My preferred and current cutter is Fletcher F 2200, and I'd happily recommend it. If you keep your eye on the second-hand market, occasionally those can be had for about half their new price. Generally they hold their value. I'd also consider F-2100, an older C&H, or if you are in EU, a good Valliani. A pro cutter not only means saved frustration, but also saving of a ton of pricey board.

    While browsing cutters, may I suggest you have a look at the APUG of framing: http://www.thegrumble.com

    PS. A 40" cutter will let you buy bigger board sizes which you could size down yourself, saving a lot, and improving quality. A 32" will limit you, especially as some of the nicer board comes as 33x46, in EU, which lets you get 4 of 16x20" with a margin for off-cuts, vital when squaring never-square-to-start-with material, or cutting off crumpled edges. Of course, if you plan to only buy pre-cut board, or large sheets which are precisely 32x40, which can be wasteful if you aim for 16x20, this point is moot.

    PPS. F2200 is a larger machine, but you could hang it on a door for storage, as I've seen others do. Bear in mind, that if you size board down, you need to square it, and that takes time and some material, avoidable if you didn't have to detach the squaring arm while putting it away. If you have a ton of cash, a wall-mounted CMC would do the trick, too.
    Last edited by Rafal Lukawiecki; 01-19-2014 at 05:21 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: PS, PPS
    Rafal Lukawiecki
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  2. #22

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    I hear you Rafal but my point of sale prints will generally be matted to 8x10 and 11x14 precut 4 ply in bins so the smaller and far less expensive Logan will easily take care of that. For larger pieces matted to 16x20 and above I will tend towards 8 ply mats and have the frame shop two blocks away do that, far more economical in the bigger picture sense.

    Once I have a permanent space at home for a proper finishing area, I can put the money into an expensive mat cutter. I only paid $100 for the press by the way, it was during the worst part of the Great Recession when an entire framing chain was going out of business...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  3. #23
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    I've used the Logan 350 many times, and it works fine for small volume such as a couple mats a week. If you need to do a lot more than that then I recommend finding their more professional cutters, such as a used 650, which is what I have now. It has a squaring arm and production stops to make repetitive cuts much faster.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

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  4. #24

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    If you're fairly new to mounting, you can learn a lot from Henry Wilhelm's 1993 book, The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs: Traditional and Digital Color Prints, Color Negatives, Slides, and Motion Pictures.

    See especially Chapter 11: "Print Mounting Adhesives and Techniques...", starting from page 377. It's available here: http://wilhelm-research.com/pdf/HW_B..._HiRes_v1c.pdf

    From your photo, I think some of the first things you're going to want are better work lights and some sort of bins to hold your mount board and the like. Good lighting is important to make sure there is no loose debris under the print; even small particles can make your print unsaleable.

  5. #25
    Rafal Lukawiecki's Avatar
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    PKM-25, let's hope the Great Recession would send a $100 professional cutter your way.

    +1 Mr Bill. A strong, positionable task light, plus good ambient lighting, are a must in my space when I am mounting. I use a Luxo-style lamp with two types of bulb in the head, incandescent/halogen and a CFL.
    Rafal Lukawiecki
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  6. #26
    MattKing's Avatar
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    From out in left field: http://www.altosezmat.com/products/4...501_cutter.htm

    I have a used one that I paid almost nothing for, that works very well. It has the same size limitations as the inexpensive Logan model you linked to.

    The model 4590 is much more heavy duty and professional, but it costs $400.00 from the (Central Washington state) manufacturer.

    If you can find a model 4505 used or new-old stock somewhere, it can handle larger borders and sheets of mat board.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #27

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    Additional ighting is a given for my work area but in the day natural light is super plentiful so it all depends on what time I am in there.

    I have a signed copy of Wilhelm's book from when I had dinner with him the day Dwayne's shut down the Kodachrome line, will take a look at it...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

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