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Thread: Selling Prints

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    Thanks for that perspective Mike. It's interesting to know how collectors of photographic prints choose which photos (and artists) to collect. Unfortunately, there are very few collectors of photos (compared with the general public). In my own situation, I could never afford to target my selling to collectors: there are just too few of you out there (in Australia).
    Graeme

    I thought the same too (about Australia) until I saw the prices Ken Duncan asks and gets for his work. I don't know what portion of his sales are exported but I'd imagine it has some bearing on it.

    Clayton

  2. #22
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by claytume
    What this means is you have to find your own way, see what works for you then go hard out.
    Michael Kenna and Rolfe Horn sell like CRAZY, and their prints are small, black and white and expensive. What Clayton said rings true.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by MurrayMinchin
    If you fancy yourself as a stock photographer, or freelancer, disregard all of the above, research your market and exploit some unoccupied niche.
    Murray
    I'm just wondering if there is an unoccupied niche!

    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    My own market research was done by taking a regular stall at the local craft market. By being there each month, I gradually worked out who the people in the market are: it turns out that people leaving the region seeking a memento of the place are my market. Everything we've done since has been aimed at those people.
    Cheers,
    Graeme I thought of taking this approach as well. I live in a tourist market being S. Florida. The tourist are mostly here for 6 months after which there's a sharp downturn in visitors.
    -------------------------
    Thank you all for sharing your wisdom.

    Two questions;
    1. Who buys your art % wise, women or men.
    2. What's the subject matter of your best two sellers.

    Watching booths at the occasional art show I find that European village scenes and countryside sell well down here, but that type of photography is out for me at present.

    At the end of this week I leave for Arizona where I will be staying for approximately three weeks visiting my family. To me, the crux of this trip is to photogaph and produce something worth selling, so for approximately 14 days say, I'll be working at image making. I ask, if would I be smarter shooting lifestyles for stock sales? Are landscapes overdone; Are flower shots passe?

    I also want to ask everyone if you shoot print film for your prints.

    Again thanks for all the great advice.
    Last edited by waynecrider; 03-22-2005 at 12:14 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph
    I try not to think of clients interests but my interests, and to persue my own vision. This works for me. Joseph
    Joseph has good advice here.


    I sell my (black and white only) work in a gallery in Central Wisconsin in a very small town. This is not to say that there is a lack of purchasing power here. When people here view my work, their first question almost without fail is "where was this taken?". I have locally shot images hanging alongside some lovely west coast shots. People readily comment on how beautiful the coastal images are, but purchase the shots taken locally. If they see something familiar framed or shot in a way which they would never conceive of shooting it, they will buy it. They also see some mystique in black and white images. Combine that with compelling composition, dramatic light and the occasional abstraction, and these images provide a new way of appreciating their surroundings.

    I could certainly shoot and print the things that I know will sell, but I will only shoot subjects and scenes that inspire and please me. This I believe elevates us in our own unique vision and portrayal of those things which serve to define us as artists.

  5. #25
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider
    I'll be working at image making. I ask, if would I be smarter shooting lifestyles for stock sales? Are landscapes overdone; Are flower shots passe?

    I also want to ask everyone if you shoot print film for your prints.
    Shoot what your passion is, otherwise your images will show it. You should also know what makes an image for you; I realized a while back that for me it is the golden light that happens towards sunrise and sunset.

    Don't shoot print film, shoot transparencies. If you are doing landscapes, try Fuji Velvia 50, which is favored by most landscape photographers, including me.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    Don't shoot print film, shoot transparencies. If you are doing landscapes, try Fuji Velvia 50, which is favored by most landscape photographers, including me.
    Yea, I read a quote the other day about West Coast Imaging suggesting shooting slide film. I'd love to shoot print just because I can get a disk done at the time of processing by my lab and it makes it a little cheaper for output, but only if I shoot 35mm. Problem is I want to shoot MF and scans add to the cost, but for big prints I can see it. For 8x10 i think it is a unnecessary expense. I did find this lab with prices that seem ok.
    http://www.Imagerylab.com/pricing.html

  7. #27
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    You should be able to get the same service, on either Slides or Prints Wayne, most of the up to date labs, have the capibilities to scan and print or scan and burn to CD, both slides and print, we have been doing this for over a year around here.

    Dave

  8. #28
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider
    I did find this lab with prices that seem ok.
    http://www.Imagerylab.com/pricing.html
    The prices are low, but they also don't use a high quality scanner. Drum scanning is the best.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #29
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    It's interesting to note the difference between what major galleries sell, and what 'satellite' galleries and art fairs sell. Black and white is far and away the most prevelant work being offered and sold at NYC galleries and other galleries displaying work at the AIPAD show. This market is heavily weighted toward collectors. Repeat sales and client relationships are sought and cultivated. The other market is for 'decor' and that favors color prints and sizes that meet decorating needs. It's here where giclee prints and digigraphs fare quite well. Buyers of this work are looking to decorate a room and the 'graph has to meet size, color and subject requirements for that purpose.

    Near my home is a gallery (the Exposures Gallery) that offers color, giclee prints which are, at least up to now, made on film, scanned, and printed digitally. The photographer, Nick Zungoli, seems to do quite well and has, in fact, opened a second gallery in Woodstock NY. It's his day job. He's making it. As a business, it's successful. Take a look.

    Alternatively, visit the Catherine Perich Gallery in nearby Katonah, NY; a much more affluent sub (or is it ex-) urb. Here you will find a fantastic list of major photographers of substantial significance.

    Both galleries are doing very well. There's a niche for everyone. But the work had better be damn good!!
    John Voss

    My Blog

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    Michael Kenna and Rolfe Horn sell like CRAZY, and their prints are small, black and white and expensive. What Clayton said rings true.
    Kenna and Horn's prints are expensive. I own a bunch of Horns, and have traveled to see his shows. They are the kind of works I aspire to make. I think the cost for their prints are well worth it, and in Horn's case, a bargain. You must see a print in real life to appreciate them the most. Summed up, if the quality is there, they will sell.

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