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Thread: Selling Prints

  1. #31

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    Wayne asked:
    Two questions;
    1. Who buys your art % wise, women or men.
    2. What's the subject matter of your best two sellers.
    1. It's about 50:50, but it very much depends on why they are buying. Often, it's the junior admin staff coming in to pick up a gift for someone leaving the office, and those staff members are usually female (refer to the thread in which women are paid less for the same work in Australia ....). Men are often buying prints as gifts for their wives/girlfriends (and vice versa). Some people are buying to decorate their office (about 70:30 men to women). When people are buying for their home, they most often come in with their partner and make the decision together.

    So, 50:50 men to women is the breakdown of my market. Does that surprise anyone?

    2. Best seller is a lightning photo (in fact 5 of the top 10 in selling volume are shots of lightning) The next best seller is a shot of an open pit mine. The top three in terms of profit are all lightning photos, and #4 is a shot of a pub.

    All of the top 15 are local scenes shot in way which people don't often see or notice, which confirms the statement from Scott Edwards about local scenes selling well.

    As most are saying, first and foremost you should shoot the things that inspire you. When your work moves you, it will move others too.

    Jovo's split of the two types of sales is probably fair, though I disagree about the decor market (mine) not seeking return sales. I keep in contact with most of my customers though a monthly newsletter and direct marketing offers.

    Clayton, regarding Ken Duncan's sales: I believe he has tapped into the collectors' market for the top end of his sales, however most of his marketing is still aimed at the upper middle-class public looking to decorate, rather than collect artworks for investment (which, with his work, is a side effect anyway). My point was that there are far fewer collectors than there are members of the general public. In my market place, there are essentially no collectors, so I'm selling to the general public. It is up to each of us to decide where we want to (and are able to) position ourselves in the market.

    wbryant's summary ("if the quality is there, they will sell")is not far from the mark, but if the image doesn't have an emotional impact on the potential buyer, quality alone will not sell a print.

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  2. #32
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider
    To me, the crux of this trip is to photogaph and produce something worth selling, so for approximately 14 days say, I'll be working at image making. I ask, if would I be smarter shooting lifestyles for stock sales? Are landscapes overdone; Are flower shots passe?
    Wayne, one word of caution here. Unless you are wanting to go full-commercial and do the stock-sales thing, watch out about thinking what will sell. Shoot what you feel, not what you think you can sell. Everytime I've gotten that feeling, the image sucked and I was sorry I did it.

    Nothing wrong with keeping abreast of what sells on the market; yes, the flowers, rushing streams and slot canyons are highly overdone IMO. Knowing those overdone scenes are popular and they "sell", I wondered if anyone would ever buy an 8x10 of a grain elevator in Kansas. But, people do buy them. So, don't worry much about whether the scene in front of you fits
    the mold or not. Get hold of something with feeling and go for it.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  3. #33

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    It seems the reoccuring theme is shoot your passion and do it dam good.

    Thanks Graeme (and all) for the input.

  4. #34
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider
    It seems the reoccuring theme is shoot your passion and do it dam good.
    *CLICK* You got it Wayne!
    Last edited by Alex Hawley; 03-22-2005 at 10:43 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added smilie!
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider
    It seems the reoccuring theme is shoot your passion and do it dam good.
    Hey, if dams and other civil engineering projects are your thing, go for it!
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  6. #36
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    Hey, if dams and other civil engineering projects are your thing, go for it!
    Works pretty good for David "no flowers" Plowden!
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    .

    Jovo's split of the two types of sales is probably fair, though I disagree about the decor market (mine) not seeking return sales. I keep in contact with most of my customers though a monthly newsletter and direct marketing offers.
    Through omission rather than volition, I perhaps gave the impression that sales for 'decor' were to one time only clients. Far from it...the local 'decor' gallery, and almost every other gallery I've ever been to regardless of their likely clientele, solicits and courts comments, and requests one sign their guestbook with the expectation of being contacted by mail and/or email regarding new work or new exhibitions. Even the transitory art or craft fair booths take pains to record the addy's of customers in the hope of establishing a continuing relationship if possible.
    John Voss

    My Blog

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