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Thread: Pricing prints

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    panchromatic's Avatar
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    Pricing prints

    Ok so yesterday I entered my work in my first non-school show. I'm a member of a local arts alliance and we are holding our members only exhibition. I submitted two pieces (which i worked hard one, but had only limited time to prepare for) Now they requested that you price your photographs. I didn't really want to sell them, though I wasn't against it. I priced my 8X10 in a 16X20 frame for $150 and two 5X7s in one frame for $85. I must admitt I was quite embarrased to do so since I had NO IDEA what to put. I've never sold, or even really looked into pricing "fine art" prints (I still call myself a novice therefor feel uncomfortable calling my work fine art) anyway I was wondering if anyone had any opinions on how to price artwork or had links to articles discussing the matter. Also did I do a good job pricing my work?

    Any and all comments welcome
    thanks in advance!
    --Ryan

    "The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance." ~Ansel Adams

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    panchromatic's Avatar
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    PS: about 95% percent of the photographers in that organization are digital... I feel lonely sometimes, haha.
    --Ryan

    "The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance." ~Ansel Adams

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    B-3
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    How about...

    take the prices you see on the digital prints of a similar size and multiply by five to arrive at fair prices for your handmade prints? Then you will send the right "message".

    Honestly, Ryan, I have no idea, only that I'm faced with a similar situation right now - new venue, no idea what to expect.

    Bruce

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    There's varied mind sets regarding this. One is to keep your prices reasonably low so they will sell. (Depending on the venue)
    i.e."I'd rather sell ten at $50 than one at $250.00."

    The other is to price higher (close but below gallery) so that it says- "this is special". It appeals to the more elitist group-the ones who easily pay $200 for a bottle of something that has a brand name on it vs. the lesser no-name brand with the same ingredients for $20.00.

    I personnaly have a 'formula" of sorts. My time + creative (= $$$) + 3 x cost of materials. But that's me.

    Basically, don't go too low, I think it de-values one.
    Formulate a value on your time. Stick to it.

    Others price the prints starting low (?) and raising as edition sells.
    The thrill of a sale is a nice high...
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

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    I would only add that this topic has been discussed extensively here in the past. Try the search tool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panchromatic
    Ok so yesterday I entered my work in my first non-school show. I'm a member of a local arts alliance and we are holding our members only exhibition. I submitted two pieces (which i worked hard one, but had only limited time to prepare for) Now they requested that you price your photographs. I didn't really want to sell them, though I wasn't against it. I priced my 8X10 in a 16X20 frame for $150 and two 5X7s in one frame for $85. I must admitt I was quite embarrased to do so since I had NO IDEA what to put. I've never sold, or even really looked into pricing "fine art" prints (I still call myself a novice therefor feel uncomfortable calling my work fine art) anyway I was wondering if anyone had any opinions on how to price artwork or had links to articles discussing the matter. Also did I do a good job pricing my work?

    Any and all comments welcome
    thanks in advance!

    How much do *you* think they're worth? Remember, only 10 years ago artists had no venue like ebay to help them decide a price.

    Look at adverts, look at galleries, LAST of all look at Ebay.



    Graham

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    I usually gauge my pricing by what I see at art shows and whether it is sold with a frame or just matted. An art show seller usually sells a matted 5x7 print as an "8x10" picture and a matted 8x10 as an 11x14 picture. I find that prices tend to stay close to each other thru different photographers, but there are standouts which command higher prices. For galleries, prices include more overhead.

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    When I price my prints, I always focus on how tired I was after carrying my 23-pound camera, 22-pound tripod and related stuff through the swamp.
    juan

  9. #9
    RAP
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    Size and price do not always go together. Micheal Kenna prints only on 8x10 paper and commands a $1,500.00 price tag at galleries. While artists like Bruce Barnbaum and John Sexton print 11x14 to 20x24 and the prints sell for about the same prices.

    What matters is the image itself and what artistic value it really has. Since we cannot see the prints, we honestly cannot say.

    However, considering this is your very first outing, price it as you seem fair. What you stated seems about right. Then see what happens. See if they sell. If they do, GREAT! Then maybe keep the prices at that level until you gain some popularity and more sales. Then maybe slowly raise them. It is very easy to price yourself out too quickly. Don't let your ego get in the way. Also, do not be afraid to let your work go, let it sell. Even greater images are just around the corner.
    Time & tides wait for no one, especially photographers.

  10. #10

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    I am one of the few Ebay Photographers, selling mainly 8x10 AZO contact prints, mounted, matted and ready for framing. I start prints at 50.00+10.00 shippings, so 60.00 dollars. Quite often, they get bid up above 100.00 dollars thought.

    In galleries and my website, I sell the exact same 8x10's for 175.00. I will soon be raising my prices thought too 250.00.

    Never under price your work. It makes you look like less of a photography and make your work seem less. The only reason I have been selling prints on Ebay for so cheep, is that the market value on Ebay for fine art is VERY low. My output of my photography has been WAY to high thought, so that is why I am raising prices.

    Goodluck!

    Ryan McIntosh

    Ebay seller-RyanMcIntoshPhotography or seach for R. McIntosh or AZO mcintosh

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