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Thread: Landscape

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    Most people don't care to have Migrant Mother, or Churchill or child running from naplam displayed in their living room.

    Just my skewed point of view.


    Michael

    I do remember a movie where there was a huge reproduction of E. Adams image of the Viet Cong prisoner getting shot in the head hanging on the wall in a room. (A Clockwork Orange?).

    In real life I think a great deal of contemporary landscape photography is sort of a reaction to the Adamesque image. The new topographers were the first to "rebel". Robert Adams, Lewis Baltz and Frank Gohlke who were interested in mans effect on the landscape and the transitional boundries between nature and the man made.

    The other movement was one of exploring the more intimate aspects of nature and finding beuaty in "common" land (everything but pristine land) or banality of surroundings. Joel Meyrowitz, Harry Callahan, Siskind, Tice.

    Today I see great emphasis towards the aesthetic of a Brett Weston or Wynn Bullock. Interest in portraying landscape or details as pure form in an almost abstract way, usually trying to isolate the subject from any cosideration as part of a greater whole. Fokos, Citriet, Kenna, Smith, Kourlis, Sean Kernan and John Sexton's images of trees, Barnbaum's Tone Poems, Don Kirby's Wheat Country, and Fay Godwin's The Edge of the Land to name a few.

    The emphasis is on finding beauty and meaning in the simple things that we walk past everyday and take for granted.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  2. #22
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn
    Joel Meyrowitz,
    I saw his book on Tuscany at the local bookstore - his images were absolutely horrid; bad exposure, flat lighting, something I would expect from someone just starting out in photography, not a "supposed" master.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #23

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    Meyrowitz shot B&W in the mid-60s, much different then what he does now. I also don't care for the Tuscany photos or even Cape Cod Light, even though the later is considered a major influence in considering color photography in a critical vein next to B&W.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  4. #24
    Bill Hahn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn
    I do remember a movie where there was a huge reproduction of E. Adams image of the Viet Cong prisoner getting shot in the head hanging on the wall in a room. (A Clockwork Orange?).
    Could it be "Stardust Memories" Woody Allen, circa 1976-7?
    "I bought a new camera. It's so advanced you don't even need it." - Steven Wright

  5. #25
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    In Doestoevsky's The Idiot Rogozhin has a reproduction of Holbein's "Christ in the Tomb" hanging over a doorway--definitely not your usual living room fare.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #26

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    landscapes

    I think the premise is misleading: To be "FINE ART" some image must evoke an emotion, a feeling. If it does not evoke one that interests the looker, then it is either a negative emotion, not necessarily a bad thing, or, much worse, a neutral feeling.

    A well done photograph should evoke a feeling, and it can be of a paint can or the grandest vista there is on this earth.

  7. #27

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    Of course people put art on their walls for all sorts of reasons. Sometimes the content has some implicit meaning to the owner and they wish to 'pay homage' or have a continual reminder of a place or person. Maybe it is entirely the visual qualities, or the way it makes them feel. Perhaps even reverence to the photographer or the amount of money they spent on the art.

    One thing I suspect most buyers consider (be it a small or large part of the decision) is how accessible the image is to others who may not be familiar with it. Others being spouses and family, friends ... those whose opinions of us are important to us. A good fine-art landscape image is probably less complicated to understand than a good fine-art portrait, or at least the motives for having it on the wall are less likely to be missinterpreted.

    Thinking for example of Karsh' Churchill. For the sake of discussion - assuming it is fine art, and that it has been purchased for the wall not a vault.
    If I put that image on my wall, it could be because I wish to espouse my political affiliations or because I hold Churchill's character in high esteem. It might be because I have a personal interest in mental health and wish to pay tribute to a man who despite suffering manic depression had some pretty significant achievements. Or perhaps I just think that Karsh was a genius. It might be simply because being a portrait photographer myself, I can appreciate what it took to achieve the image and want to regularly look at one of the finest examples of a portrait ever done. Perhaps I just paid a lot for it and want to show off. Point is the reasons could be complicated and easily missinterpreted without further insight. Imagine what the reasons might be if there is a photo of Kim Phuk running from napalm on the wall.

    On the other hand i do have a waterfall on my wall that is often looked at closely by other people. It is arguably the most photographed landscape subject (and arguably one of the least qualified to be 'modern art'). I appreciate it for the degree of art and craft. I admire the photographer. Other people usually like it a lot. My reasons and motives for displaying it aren't complicated. It was expensive, but the value in return is enormous to me the buyer.

    Perhaps it is as simple as the fact that landscapes just work_well as fine-art for the wall.

    But who knows - as the market for fine photographs for the wall changes and matures further, and buyers' tastes and understanding become more sophisticated it could all change. Or maybe my meanderings are way off ...

    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    As for photographers, photographing people is probably harder than landscapes ...
    Hmmm ... I used to think that as well ... until I tried to do a good landscape.

  8. #28

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    Because I love the world around me, and I photograph the things I love.
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  9. #29

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    Well, drive somewhere and get out of the car and the first thing might notice is the landscape (or cityscape, or cloudscape or seascape .... you get the idea). Some people collect what they like, and most people appreciate these things. A collection of street shots of say New York might not do well in a gallery out west, but then a collection of landscapes of the west might not do well back east.

    Let's face it, the general public might prefer color work over black and white...recall a gallery owner in Santa Fe telling me that they needed a good platinum printer to include with the rest of the work...Why?..they felt it would appeal to some of the customers. Don't know that it changed anything, just something the owner thought would help move some of the work.

    Even though I like landscapes, most of the work I do seems to be more urban in nature, because that is what is close by for me to work with. Learned my love of photography reading Life magazine...not many landscapes were featured in it..but a lot of good street, war and other photography.

    If someone can actually figure out what the 'collectors' want before they do, they could stock up on it cheap and sell it for unreal prices.....but my crystal ball must be old and a bit blurry...because I don't have a clue. And since the feeling I get from most on this site is they shoot for themselves, not for what someone might want...it really does not matter.

    JMO...
    Mike C

    Rambles

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by photomc
    recall a gallery owner in Santa Fe telling me that they needed a good platinum printer to include with the rest of the work...
    Have a phone number?
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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