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  1. #1
    Shinnya's Avatar
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    Construction of gallery wall

    Hi,

    I am not sure if this is the right place to post or not, but I am wondering if anyone has an experience in the actual construction of a gallery space.

    I have been working on this warehouse to create a place for photography enthusiasts. In it, I want to have a gallry space. My question is that if there is any special ways to build gallery walls. Are they just simply drywall?

    Let me know if you have a clue/experience for it. Thanks in advance.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi
    Last edited by Shinnya; 08-02-2005 at 09:27 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Construction of gallery wall

  2. #2
    DavidS's Avatar
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    >I have been working on this warehouse to create a place for photography enthusiasts. In it, I want to have a gallry space. My question is that if there is any special ways to build gallery walls. Are they just simply drywall?<

    I would think you should use drywall, but use a plywood "skin" outside the wall. Think about it, you're going to be hanging up, taking down, hanging up, taking down framed photos, re-hanging them, hammering in new nails, taking out old screws, etc. I think drywall would crack and break under situations like this. Use a plywood skin, do a good painting job on top of it of a really beautiful, high quality white paint and I think you've got it from there.

  3. #3
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    Hi There

    I have built many gallery spaces, over the last 15 years, They all have been drywall. My latest gallery has Very high ceilings which we used drywall floor to ceiling , good taping and sanding and a couple of coats of quality white paint.
    We splurged and made the floors Bamboo and the space looks great.

    If I had not splurged on the floor, I would have used a system for hanging prints.*Akora* I believe, very ingenious method of hanging prints, slick looking but very pricey.

    After each show we putty the holes that were made and repaint the walls. We change the shows 4-6 times a year so this is not too much of a hassel.

    good luck with your space
    Bob

  4. #4
    Shinnya's Avatar
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    Bob,

    Thank you for your comment.

    The drywall can take all the weight of the frame? I just assumed there is something studier behind the drywall, like sheet of a plywood or something, to hold the weight of them.

    So every time you just spackle and repaint? My place has a high ceiling as well like 13' which disguise the narrowness of the space...

    Thanks for your comment again.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi


    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie

    I have built many gallery spaces, over the last 15 years, They all have been drywall. My latest gallery has Very high ceilings which we used drywall floor to ceiling , good taping and sanding and a couple of coats of quality white paint.
    We splurged and made the floors Bamboo and the space looks great.

    Bob

  5. #5

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    One of the best systems I have come across for hanging work in a gallery was at the Edward Carter Gallery in NYC. They hung the framed prints on large, 4x8' wide panels. The panels were made of plywood which was then lightly padded with batting and then covered with a fabric with a slightly coarse weave. The effect was that no matter how many times you put a nail in the panel, it never showed a hole. They never had to paint, the walls always looked perfect and if they sold a large piece off the wall they could easily replace it with any size piece without worrying about moving the nail and leaving an exposed hole. It was also a very attractive way to show art and it also added a certain amount of sound deadening to the room. So many galleries are loud because of all the hard walls and no soft materials.

  6. #6
    Shinnya's Avatar
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    I have to visit there to see them...

    I guess it does not have to be conventional walls. I am also up for any interesting ideas like this as well.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi


    Quote Originally Posted by Early Riser
    One of the best systems I have come across for hanging work in a gallery was at the Edward Carter Gallery in NYC.

  7. #7

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    Alas Edward Carter Gallery is no more....

  8. #8
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    Well, I think I should be able to supply you with a good answer - as an architect who's currently building my own gallery and has designed walls for the guggenheim. Generally speaking, you DEFINITELY want some backing behind the drywall. Use the thickest drywall you can possibly deal with - if you have a long run of wall it will pay off. I'm using 5/8" type X (since yours is not a fire-separation wall you don't need to use X) but this is the THINNEST that I would use. The drywall alone won't REALLY cut it - unless you're hanging really light stuff and you're into patching.

    But anyway - most people seem to want to use 3/4" CDX or else 1/2" baltic birch ply (stronger - and not really more expensive actually!). You can either overlay on top of the studs which is EXPENSIVE since you'll have to cover the ENTIRE wall - or else block in between studs only at hanging height. What would be cheaper still, and better - if you're hanging conventional works at a standardized height - is to use 2x12s blocked in between studs at a height that will work for you. If you choose to hang ply or 2Xs between studs - you'll need to screw 2x2s in so the backing material can be screwed into something. (and yes, use screws!! I like deck screws). So the 2x2s will have to be offset by the thickness of the backer.

    Of UTMOST importance is going to be how good your framing is. If it's not dead-on, it will show. This also applies to your plaster work. Do the drywall yourself - but find someone to tape and mud it and DEFINITELY skim-coat the thing. It will really pay off.

  9. #9
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    Oh - one more thing...
    I'm assuming this is a BRICK warehouse...? If so - you should also bolt the framing into the brick. Use a hilti masonry bit to drill holes for 3/8" Hilti HIT anchors (expensive) or else use red-heads (much cheaper but crappier) to fasten framing directly or else use a heavy gauge steel angle.

    A nice touch is to add some R-13 between the studs too. It works wonders for the acoustics of the space as illogical as it might seem to you. Feel free to ask if you have other questions.

  10. #10
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    As an alternative to the Hilti anchors, there are "Tapcon" screws. Use a hammer drill and the proper bit, then the screws will self-tap into masonry or concrete. While the Hilti may be stronger, the Tapcons work well and will save time and money. tim

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