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  1. #11

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    I have used a middle grey matte fairly consistently. But an (off) white matte would work for a lot of my prints.

    Earl
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

  2. #12
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    Is there a reason that mats must be black/white/gray? Can you use colors? I've always wondered this...
    Jeanette
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    Isaiah 25:1

  3. #13
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    Be aware of the various whites that mats come in. Consider warm tone papers and neutral cold tone ones and the variety of 'whites' available and you will see that the 'wrong' white doesn't work well at all. When possible, see if you can get a set of samples (lightimpressions, for instance, sells a 4x5 set at nominal cost). It can make an enormous difference when you make the best match.
    John Voss

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  4. #14

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    Great care should be taken when choosing your mat board. Black may have a tendency to make your prints appear washed out or discolored. The dmax in your images may be toned and a black mat will bring out the toning in these areas a bit too much. An overly yellowish mat will definitely highlight selenium toning because yellow is the complimentary to violet, and as such will make your dmax seem overly purple. The best solution I find is to use cotton rag mat which is natural in color, that is to say, almost pure white and is archivally sound. Bainbridge makes this as well as Crescent. This particular board does not detract from your highlights and will present your image in a professional manner. There are quite a few venues that will only present fine art photography in white rag mats.

  5. #15

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    Jeanette

    I have found that color mats seem to compete with the BW like oil and water.

    On the the other hand I knew a lady whould hand color only one very small part of her BW images. She would mat the picture in a mat very close to or contrasting with that one color and it was really neat.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  6. #16
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BWGirl
    Is there a reason that mats must be black/white/gray? Can you use colors? I've always wondered this...
    Coloured card can be used for mounts, but they usually distract from the image. I follow Henry Ford's dictum that mounts can be any colour you like as long as they are off-white.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  7. #17
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    I generally use an off-white. Most of my prints are warm, often lightly sepia toned and a plain white matt looks "wrong". I think cold toned prints look better with a plain white matt. I've never tried black. I'll have to get some next time I am buying to see how it looks.

    I suspect a dark, warm colour might look good but it would shout "gimmick!" to me. Probably I'm just too conservative...


    Cheers, Bob.

  8. #18
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    One thing I have noticed when buying print most are mounted on the same mat board that wraps the print. Is there a reason for this rather, then using archival foam board which doesn't deform as much in humid conditions.

    Also some bring the mat up to the print. While others leave an 1" or so around the print.

    Thanks, Randy

  9. #19
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    Just an opinion but...
    The former may be due to the fact that many don't believe that foamcore is truly archival and also because of eas. The latter issue may be a matter of taste.

    *

  10. #20
    ann
    ann is online now

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    i tried mounting a project on formcore and didn't like it, the core is much too soft and the images did all sorts of unlikely things.

    as to the backs being the same color as the window.
    Many people cut their own windows and buy board in large amounts and so one has the board handy and available.

    On the other hand, we have used different shades of white as the back board if the window overlays the print, as it will not show.
    If one floats the print within the window, it visually looks better (IMHO) to have the back board the same as the window.
    Just a personal opinion

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