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  1. #21
    Rlibersky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcallow
    Just an opinion but...
    The former may be due to the fact that many don't believe that foamcore is truly archival and also because of eas. The latter issue may be a matter of taste.
    I will agree it is easier to work with the mat board.

  2. #22
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    What about white with a black core?
    Diane

    Halak 41

  3. #23
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colrehogan
    What about white with a black core?
    I used to use this all the time. It gives that nice line of separation when you have very light areas of the print adjacent to the white mat.
    The pieces cut out of the mats make great burners and dodgers in the darkroom too. White on the top so that you can see the projected image on them, Black on the bottom to prevent reflected light from bouncng back onto the paper.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #24
    lee
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    my opinion is if you want to use the colored matt boards go ahead and use it but dont complain when galleries and museums dont think much of your workor take you seriously. You can defend your matt choices all you want but the museums and galleries are generally not too impressed with colored matts. A lot of frame shops will lead you in the belief you need color to blend with the frame and the dominate colors in the print if color. This leads me to believe this leads to "couch art". Interior designer art. no thank you

    lee\c
    Last edited by lee; 09-12-2005 at 02:36 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: and info

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rlibersky
    One thing I have noticed when buying print most are mounted on the same mat board that wraps the print. Is there a reason for this rather, then using archival foam board which doesn't deform as much in humid conditions.
    Again, when using cotton rag, most of this is the same color (natural, almost pure white) and galleries and museums like to see mat and mount in cotton rag. This makes the image more valuable because of the real and perceived archival stability in the presentation. Therefore the mount and overmat will be the same color by default. I would never use foam core as a mount. I do, however, use it as backing behind the mount to keep out contaminants and humidity.

  6. #26
    Pastiche's Avatar
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    Scott's got it.
    The fact is - 98% of all galleries and museums want/use white matts. It's part tradition, but also largely - again, like Scott said - you dont want your matt to show up your print. When printing on warm paper, get a warm matt, cold toned paper, colder matt. You NEVER want your matt to be brighter than your highlights, b/c as your eye flows over the image, it's naturaly going to go tot the brightest spot... if it's the matt, the viewer is no longer looking at your image.

    While black matts may look elegant, there should be a dam good reason for using them... it's just part of convention that they not be used. And, since they are hardly ever used, now, if you hang in black, everyone will be oogling your matts.. not the work. I dont recomend it when hanging in public.

    Whether to matt - "full bleed" which shows the entire paper, to it's edge, and then gives a gap all around, or "over matted" which necessarily encroaches on the image a touch- is totaly a matter of taste.

    Whatever you do with matt board, you want to make sure that it's not "wild", as no one wants to look at the matt. Keep it low key, in the "background"...

  7. #27
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    The mat color is all part of the great mystery of What "Works" and What Doesn't. I've been pondering that one for some time, now, and I don't think I'm any closer to the answer than when I started.

    I remember Herb Ritts' show at the MFA in Boston. All the work had black, canvas textured mats ... and It all seemed to WORK. That show populated five (5) LARGE rooms in the museum.

    If anything, I tend (n.b. "tend") to match the "key" with the mat. A high-key image seems to work well with a white mat; low-key with black....

    I do have a Nude in brilliant autumn foliage matted with a black mat, and that particular combination has an uncanny amount of "depth". It seems to rival an image viewed through a stereoscope.

    Two of my gallery images here will be hung in a local show tomorrow: Shagbark Hickory ... in a black mat; and Classical Nude, in white.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  8. #28

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    In general, I have found that dark or colored matts appeal more to men while white matts appeal more to women. I know this sounds strange, but the correlation is very strong. I sell more prints if I frame them in white matts because it is mostly women who buy things to hang on there walls.

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