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  1. #11
    wfe
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    I print squares (med format negatives) in two sizes 7" x 7" and 10" x 10" but mostly the 10" x 10" and mat them to 14" square for the 7" x 7" and 18" square for the 10" x 10". Thinking about doing some roughly 15" square. I believe that it is largly personal preference combined with what may work for a particular image. I do like the intimacy associated with smaller prints. Larger prints can be very striking and attractive. I do sell enough of them to support the additional costs for the larger sizes.
    ~Bill
    "Real Art is a Thin Breath Exhaled Amidst a Struggle in the Mind"
    Fine Art and Portraits

  2. #12
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    I've had three shows so far - all local affairs. The first was all on 8x10 paper and the whole experience is pretty much a blur. The second was all on 11x14 paper and I found it visually disturbing to have a close-up 11x14 next to a wide open, huge sky landscape 11x14. The last show ranged from 5x7 close-ups, to 8x10 middle distance images, to 11x14 big sky images. All were hung not on a single line, but kind of "jumbled together" in a random pattern and it was way more satisfying to the eyes.

    Since then I've discovered that buying a 50 sheet box of 16x20 is less $ than buying 200 sheets of 8x10. Now I can print everything from 5x7 to 16x20 on one paper, from one emulsion batch Next time I'll go from 5x7 close-ups, to 16x20 big sky landscapes.

    Something I noticed with having all the prints the same size, is that people find their comfortable viewing distance and stay that far from the prints for the whole show. With a small close-up, they'll get real close for a good look then move to the big print next to it where they'll be close enough to notice fine details before moving back to a comfortable big print viewing distance. I think it created a more intimate experience for people than staying back 10 feet and scanning them all from the same distance.

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  3. #13
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MurrayMinchin
    ...Since then I've discovered that buying a 50 sheet box of 16x20 is less $ than buying 200 sheets of 8x10...
    I have looked at buying 16x20 in the past and cutting it down, but the difference in price (for the paper I use, anyway) is only $8 so I'm much happier not struggling with cutting down that size paper.
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  4. #14

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    Spend 80$ more on a paper-cutter large enough to cut 16" in one swipe, to save 8$ a box of 100? Hmm.

    I guess it's a good longterm investment.

  5. #15

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    i used to always print 11x14s and somehow started printing 16x20s...
    but over the years have come back down to 8x10 (sometimes printed on 11x14 paper) or smaller ... i can't remember why i went as large as 16x20, maybe just to prove to myself that i could do it ..

    i like small prints. you aren't overwhelmed by them, and if you want to make a small book, it'll look really nice.

  6. #16

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    My own considerations regarding print size and matting are as follows:

    Living in a 4 room flat that has as its largest room of 12x16 feet and making prints for my only own enjoyment when viewed on the wall or in my hand , how big does a print need to be ? Since I will be storing many more prints than I will have on the wall at any one time, what size print boxes am I willing to devote storage space ? What do I think I can afford to do?


    The very great majority of what I do is to photograph static subjects with a 35mm camera. Therefore when taking a photograph I am able to use a tripod. Almost always I am able to find a camera position that will allow me to fill either the 24mm or the 36mm dimension to my satisfaction. In a lot of cases I find a camera position the allows me to simultaneously fill both dimensions to my satisfaction. When I unable to fill both dimensions of my frame I consider before making the negative how the unfilled dimension(s) will be cropped.

    Having developed my film, I project unto an 8X10 piece of photo paper
    a 6 1/2 x 9 3/34" image. My enlarger head is rarely moved. I take my finished 6 1/2 x 9 3/4" image and tack a piece of dry mounting tissue to it. If my thought when exposing the film was to use all of the negative I just trim into the image a little as possible while removing al non image photo paper. Otherwise I trim the print as I originally conceived it. This print is the mounted somewhat above center on an 11x14 board.

    I allow my self little leeway in doing these things. It simplifies my life.
    When viewing the finished print I am either satisfied or I am faced to confront my sloppy work and thought. In either case the print has value in either giving me a reconnection with my reason for taking the photo or in forcing me to realize, everytime I see the print, that I should use my head and stop being such a dummy. Of course, I also produce some negatives that are very efficient to deal with in that they go directly from the developed film to the most important darkroom device I own..a 40 gallon thrash can. Otherwise I try to stick with what I visualized when looking thru the finder..this is meant more in a general than a aboslute zone by zone comparison of what I now think I originally intended. I believe there can be value in not second guessing yourself.

    So now I have some prints that are easy to store and with which the viewer, me, is able to see with sufficient clarity.

    Well known am I for producing prints of a very highly evolved nature as far as their ability to bore. I rarely use an over mat. My thoughts being: The print box is a darkened bedroom. The mounting board is the print's bed.
    I am just too cheap to provide a blanket by using an over mat.

    These are my thoughts. They have servered me well enough so that I am reluctant to change them.

    What you do, how you do it and why you do it is, I believe, properly your choice not mine.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  7. #17

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    I Print 5x7 for BW because I have too. It is the largest neg I can get at this time. I am not sure I want to go bigger. I admit to being a print sniffer. I like to hold the print and look into it. Big BW prints just don't thrill me. COlor on the other hand is different. I like big color prints, not huge just big. SInce I print color with the big bad D process I won't comment on their size.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #18
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    INITIATING SELF-DEFENCE PROCEDURE

    I picked up a huge paper cutter from a retired professional photographer for next to nothing, and from Henry's in Canada 100 sheets 8x10 Multigrade IVFB is $99.99 and 50 sheets 16x20 is $169.00. You can do the math, but it's sure more than $8.00 in savings. Oh ya...and all my paper is from one emulsion batch which makes my life easier which of course makes me

    Murray

  9. #19
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MurrayMinchin
    INITIATING SELF-DEFENCE PROCEDURE

    I picked up a huge paper cutter from a retired professional photographer for next to nothing, and from Henry's in Canada 100 sheets 8x10 Multigrade IVFB is $99.99 and 50 sheets 16x20 is $169.00. You can do the math, but it's sure more than $8.00 in savings. Oh ya...and all my paper is from one emulsion batch which makes my life easier which of course makes me

    Murray
    I use Kentmere Fineprint VC Fiber and Kentmere VC Fiber Warmtone (both are the same price)
    Prices per BH Photo: 100 box of 8x10 - $53.99, 50 box of 16x20 - $99.99, the difference between 2 boxes of 8x10 and 1 box of 16x20 is only $7.99.

    If I were to save as much money as you, then I, too, would buy big and cut them down. It all depends on how much you have to pay for paper.
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

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