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  1. #11
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wfe
    I believe that presentation is the artist's personal choice and is in fact a large component of the image. I don't believe that there is a "right" way to do it. At this point in my photographic evolution I perfer white mat board but I still love well presented photographs that don't follow my choice.
    I too prefer white matting. However, I triple mat my images - one mat for the print, followed by a colored layer (one in harmony with the print), followed by an upper white mat. The colored mat only shows 1/8" all around, so it is very subtle. I use this method for all but my two largest sizes; 30x40 and 40x50, where I only double mat (white).

    For the frames, I prefer wood; mostly a reddish or honey colored wood. I am considering using Koa (a member of the Acacia family) for some images, but Koa is rare and hard to come by; which drives the cost up significantly.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  2. #12
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi
    I don't know - when I go to photographic exhibitions, I so often get frustrated/dissapointed with the seemingly consensus, that all images are matted white - they are very often the same size - they are framed with a tiny metal frame, and they hang so straight, that if you place your hands on your back - bend over a tiny bit, you can "do" any exhibition in 45 sec or less....
    It is irritating , I agree. While I do mat in white (see my previous post), for exhbitions, I prefer a variety of sizes and a variety of frames (frames are chosen to complement the image). In the exhibit I am currently working on, I have a number of framed 16x20 (11x14 images) and 24x30 (20x24 images) prints, as well as one 34x44 (30x40 image) print.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #13
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    (frames are chosen to complement the image)..
    that's the sentence I can't understand.

    i fthe frame is to compliment the image, and thereby will change by the image, why not the matting colour?
    I think it is a whole.

  4. #14
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi
    that's the sentence I can't understand.

    i fthe frame is to compliment the image, and thereby will change by the image, why not the matting colour?
    I think it is a whole.
    Yes, I agree they are a whole. But, I change the only inner mat color and the frame, to compliment the image. But, I still have the top mat white.

    I don't see anything wrong with changing the mat color when double matting.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #15
    blansky's Avatar
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    Back when I did color portraits I always used brown wooden frames with no glass and no mattes. Most of the pictures were canvas mounted.

    Now that I do strickly black and white I use the sort of "New York Art Framing method" which is either silver or black frames with a white matte.

    I guess in theory the frame and the matte sort of disappear and your are just left with the picture.

    I rarely like multi color matts with color pictures. It always seemed to me to be that framing places like to stick as many color mattes down to jack up the price.

    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  6. #16
    davetravis's Avatar
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    I'm wrapping up my second year on the art show circuit.
    Last winter, I took several pieces to a local gallery for "critique."
    They were double colored mats, in colored aluminum frames, under plexi.
    The gallery director was blatantly distressed.
    She said they would never sell to the public, because "everyone in the business" knows you must use the "museum" presentation, and to show with colors will limit where and how the customer can hang them.
    I explained to her that I tried the "museum" presentation on the circuit, and never sold a single one. She was perplexed, but still refused to accept them as they were. The lesson I learned was better to sell and be wrong, than not sell and be right.
    Besides, cutting my own mats and selecting my own frames adds that little extra uniqueness that is fun for me, and the collector.

  7. #17
    Struan Gray's Avatar
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    My personal favourites are the huge blackwood frames popular in the sixteenth century. The trees are gone now.

    Failing that, Edwardian-style framing for drawings looks good to me. If you want new, these people do good replicas: www.holtonframes.com.

  8. #18
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davetravis
    The lesson I learned was better to sell and be wrong, than not sell and be right.
    Besides, cutting my own mats and selecting my own frames adds that little extra uniqueness that is fun for me, and the collector.
    this lesson is the one I don't want to learn.

    the next sentence makes a lot more sense to me.

    I don't usually sell anything worth mentioning, but when I am dead, the museums in question (should they care) have to take the whols packet..

    I can see it before me: "ooh - look at those frames.. he was special.."

  9. #19
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    As far as decorating, I have always thought that the mat color should transition the color of the art into the color of the environment. Therefore I would hesitate to suggest a mat color without knowing the color scheme of the room where it will hang. The same goes for a frame style. It should fit both the room and the photograph. I would just as soon let the decorator deal with that.
    That said, since I shoot B&W almost exclusively, I always use a neutral mat, generally white. I offer to cut mats for my prints because they are rarely a standard size and shape.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  10. #20
    davetravis's Avatar
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    I can see it before me: "ooh - look at those frames.. he was special.."

    Gandolfi, That would certainly be true, it the photographer/printer also hand-made a beautiful frame to display his work.
    But who has the time?
    My basement is full of "experiments" that the public rejected.
    One must be pragmatic to pay the bills, even at the expense of some personal preference.

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