Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,285   Posts: 1,535,080   Online: 1151
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 40 of 40
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,236
    Images
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by KenM
    Personally, the mount and frame should be as unobtrusive as possbile. They should be neither complimentary, nor should they degrade from the image. They should be invisible - they're there to hold the image so one can look at it.

    The last compliment I want when someone is looking at one of my photographs is "Great Frame", or "Nice Mat". If you get that, you've done something wrong.

    I want people to look at the *image*, not the frame or the mount.

    Just my $0.02 worth....
    SO why bother with a mat and frame?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #32
    Pastiche's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    319
    any mat serves to isolate, and somewhat formalize the image. The roots of the mat certainly (read-educated guess) come from the longer and more thought out traditions of classic painting.
    That said - I'm with Ken. I don't want anyone looking at the mat/frame.
    There is a simple optical reason as well - light tones advance, darker tones recede. The mat should not be lighter than the highlights IN the picture (or so goes the academic thinking), but just a few shades off.
    There are also other things going on - from the gallery's viewpoint, they want the work on the wall to not "compete" with each other (group show situations), so having a uniform mat and frame style puts every image on a level playing field.
    AND - the assumption is that once the image is purchased, the buyer is expected to mat the image as he/she pleases (if they dont like what it came with), as well as frame it in acordance to their particular tastes/setting. Your carefully selected overmat may get discarded, and replaces with any color they wish - after all, they own the thing, who's to tell them what to do with it?

  3. #33
    derekh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    parkdale
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by BWGirl
    Just a word of caution... If you do not mat, put in spacers so your print does not touch the glass.... it will, over time "become one" with the glass... not a good thing.

    That is probably the main purpose of matting... to protect the print from the glass.


    Does anyone have any suggestions on how to construct spacers for this purpose? I'm interested in this method of framing and am wondering if there is a standard way of doing this.

  4. #34
    jimgalli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tonopah Nevada
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,401
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    155
    Quote Originally Posted by KenM
    Personally, the mount and frame should be as unobtrusive as possbile. They should be neither complimentary, nor should they degrade from the image. They should be invisible - they're there to hold the image so one can look at it.

    The last compliment I want when someone is looking at one of my photographs is "Great Frame", or "Nice Mat". If you get that, you've done something wrong.

    I want people to look at the *image*, not the frame or the mount.

    Just my $0.02 worth....
    Perfectly said. The image needs to stand on it's own without any other helps from fancy frames and wordy paragraphs.

    That rule like any can occasionaly be broken. I went through a stage with color work where I was combing the mining camp trash piles for "found" frames of rust and sometimes colored enamel objects. In some of those cases as in the example Gandolfi provides the frame is truly an extension of the artists hand as much as the image. The entire piece becomes a sculpture. I have room for that in my thinking. But for the other 1000 to that 1, the frame should be invisible. Especially with black and white. I've been scolded recently for using black foam core / black mat.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    829
    Images
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by jimgalli
    I've been scolded recently for using black foam core / black mat.

    That's funny. I've been pondering the use of black mat board for a couple images of mine where the highlights are important. I was thinking it might bring them out even more. Still feels sort of cheesy to me though.

  6. #36
    laz
    laz is offline
    laz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Lower Hudson Valley (NY)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,118
    I rather detest colorful mats and to a slightly lesser degree colorful frames. Black or white mat only. I'm sometimes tempted toward gray but I always talk myself way out of being so wild.

    I associate color matting with cheap prints. I understand and am not judgemental about sculptural frames, they are just not to my taste.

    I will add that I prefer an off-white to stark white which I find too cold and harsh. For a high contrast print that demands a stark mat I like black.

    -Bob
    [SIZE=1]I want everything Galli has![/SIZE]
    [SIZE=1]I want to make images like Gandolfi![/SIZE]
    rlazell@optonline.net

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    New York
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    220
    Images
    36
    Glass spacers - Framespace and Econospace are two brands of plastic spacers for framing - try www.unitedmfrs.com for large orders, or Light Impressions for smaller lots at a higher price. Econospace is a pressure sensitive strip that attaches to the glass - in either clear or black. Framespace is a double channel design that will put from 1/8" up to 3/4" of space between print and glass - comes in clear, black and white. A "friendly" local frame shop may be able to show you samples.

  8. #38

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    463
    Images
    6
    "The photo, in it's mount, becomes a fine piece of furniture."

    Yes, many people frame & mat photos to match the pattern on the couch, the carpet or aunt Tilley's flower print dress.

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    I've recently met this young lady who works in a frame shop. She has a set of ideas for what would be the best for photo frames, but I disagree with her 100 percent. We were talking about this in a cafe yesterday.

    But the thing is, she does the framing, and I make the photographs. If all I care about is only my shots and prints, I wonder how easy my life will become. And now I'm getting a slightly diffrent motivation why I want to hook up with her in a way.

  10. #40
    CPorter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    West KY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,662
    Images
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Pastiche
    any mat serves to isolate, and somewhat formalize the image. The roots of the mat certainly (read-educated guess) come from the longer and more thought out traditions of classic painting.
    That said - I'm with Ken. I don't want anyone looking at the mat/frame.
    There is a simple optical reason as well - light tones advance, darker tones recede. The mat should not be lighter than the highlights IN the picture (or so goes the academic thinking), but just a few shades off.
    There are also other things going on - from the gallery's viewpoint, they want the work on the wall to not "compete" with each other (group show situations), so having a uniform mat and frame style puts every image on a level playing field.
    AND - the assumption is that once the image is purchased, the buyer is expected to mat the image as he/she pleases (if they dont like what it came with), as well as frame it in acordance to their particular tastes/setting. Your carefully selected overmat may get discarded, and replaces with any color they wish - after all, they own the thing, who's to tell them what to do with it?
    I think this makes sense and I think the print in consideration should stand on its own without needing support from the matting/framing chosen.

    I will remember the "light tones advance, darker tones recede" statement---I have often thought that some of my prints would look better if matted on a light gray or off white mat, but just have never done it.

    Chuck

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin