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  1. #31
    reellis67's Avatar
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    One of the issues that has come up just recently in regard to dry mounted images is how to save the work when the mount is damaged. In the wake of Katrina, many images have been lost in collections in Louisiana because the mounts were damaged by water, mud, pollutants, wastes, etc. Even though the print might have only needed a careful cleaning, the mount could not be cleaned or removed from the print. I have also seen some prints that were torn apart when the support board got wet and pulled on part of the wet print unevenly, while others were torn when the supports dried unevenly or adhered to a surface.

    I don't think that the shift of thought on dry mounting has to do with making the lives of conservators easier as much as it has to do with unforseen happenings to works of art like mishandling, poor storage, misrepresentation of products by manufacturers, and other factors that may be out the influence of the creator of the image but that affect the long term ability to protect the work. And, as stated above, ideas change frequently so what is popular today may not continue to be popular next year.

    - Randy

  2. #32

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    Some provisions also have to be made for space. I can store 50 unmounted photographs printed on 11x14 photo paper in a relatively small box. Fifty prints mounted on 16x20 boards take up a lot more space.

  3. #33

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    Like I said before, the mount of a print should be handled and cared for in the same way that a loose print is. I have several old Adams prints that are in perfect condition because the print was cared for properly. If your matted prints are having foxed corners, spots and stains, bends, or anything of the sorts....just learn to care for your artwork better.

    As for storage, yes...loose prints take up less space then matted prints clearly. However, you can store TWICE the number of prints if you use 2ply mat, rather then 4ply. You can also mat to smaller sizes and purchase portfolio cases where the prints can be stored flat.

  4. #34
    Mongo's Avatar
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    To get back to Daniel's question...as a couple of people have mentioned, your problem is most likely that the iron is too hot. I used to do my dry-mounting with an iron (used only for this purpose), set at the low end of medium, with a piece of hot pressed watercolor paper between the iron and the photograph. Working slowly from the center outward, I was able to mount prints quite well. The problem was that it took too long, and I had to work throughout the entire process (which just isn't any fun).

    My second solution (similar to the marble cutting board method mentioned above) was to get two marble floor tiles, 12" x 12" (for $1 on closeout at the hardware store), and heat them over a pan on the stove. No water...just use the pan to keep the marble off of the fire by balancing the tiles on the top of the pan. (Don't use a pan that you want to cook with for this, as you will destroy any non-stick surface by overheating it, and you will eventually scrape the pan with a tile that slips from your hand...it will happen.) Place the two tiles with their flat sides together atop the pan, heat for about five-ten minutes, then remove the tiles from the pan (very large, heavy oven mits are needed for this!), place a sandwich of watercolor paper, backing board, dry-mount paper, photograph, and another piece of watercolor paper between the stones, then set them aside for a few hours. The stones are probably too hot when they start out, but by allowing the whole stack to cool without moving, you'll get your picture mounted very well. The downside here, again, is time. But at least you don't have to work an iron over the prints...less effort.

    My final solution was to get a press off of eBay. I got lucky by finding one that was in some strange category, and the sellers knew how to use DHL to move heavy things around. Shipping only set me back $25 or so, and I got the press for the opening bid...I think the entire thing cost me $105. Patience is your best friend on eBay.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongo
    Don't use a pan that you want to cook with for this, as you will destroy any non-stick surface by overheating it, and you will eventually scrape the pan with a tile that slips from your hand...it will happen.
    Please don't use a Teflon or any type of non-stick coated pan when doing this. Teflon will release toxic fumes when overheated, enough to kill pet birds and possibly make you ill.

  6. #36
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    anyone have any idea on how to flatten prints w/o a hot press????
    Maybe the two hot rocks method??? . . . yah. . I'll be in the market for a press soon as well.. I can see..

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