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  1. #11
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jvarsoke
    VI + grep.

    (it's a unix thing)
    Yeah, but they can't tell me how much income a particular image has made over a period of time and in what size.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  2. #12

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    Like roteague (Robert), I too have spent a lot of time writing a database application to manage my images. I am a database administrator and I have discovered my original image management system of 3 ring binders and print file sleaves seem to work best for me.
    The conclusion one might take from both of our experiences is, if two people who know how to build a software program for managing images, rely on an analog approach then that might be the way to go.
    However, each one of us needs to find what works for them.

    Just my opinion.

    Gary
    "He who expecteth nothing,
    Shall not be disappointed." Robert Willingham, 1907

  3. #13
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    For now the only system I have develop is to give a unique ID number to each of my film rolls (I don't shoot sheets) and write the label on the printfile and on the back of the contact sheet. That way I keep each separated but it is easy to find what I need. When I can, I also write down the frame number at the back of prints, so that I know the exact roll and picture # of my pictures. I was thinking also about a database system, but what good would it be without scans? Then how will you relate your database to your physical negs? I think the only DB that would be useful for me is for storing developing + printing information (dodge/burn, etc).
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  4. #14
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv
    I was thinking also about a database system, but what good would it be without scans? Then how will you relate your database to your physical negs? I think the only DB that would be useful for me is for storing developing + printing information (dodge/burn, etc).
    You don't necessarily need a database system that matches scans with image data - although there are many such programs available, mainly geared towards digital photographers. The system I was developing, was only supposed to help me find the the images in my files, based upon keywords. I still needed to pull them out and put them on a light table. With 20,000+ transparencies, I don't see much use in a database application that displays thumbnails - that is way too much overload.

    FWIW, I know that Jack Dykinga uses the Agave SPS Stock Photography management software. http://www.prenticephoto.com/Agaveweb.htm . I've looked at it; it is a bit outdated, but has a lot of useful features.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #15
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    does anyone have an idea what this new Apple program Apeture can do for organizing ones work???

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    Yeah, but they can't tell me how much income a particular image has made over a period of time and in what size.
    Okay, throw in AWK.

  7. #17
    OldBikerPete's Avatar
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    Try looking up EndNote. It's a database system intended for indexing reprints of scientific literature and has excellent searching facilities. You would need to assign a reference number to each piece of film and store the pieces in order so that you could immediately locate a piece identified by a software search.

  8. #18

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    A couple years ago I spent some time in the winter creating a database for my photographs and then entering the info for twenty years worth of transparencies. As others have already mentioned it can be time consuming and needs to be continually updated as new photos are taken. In my case the time and effort expended have been worth it. My transparencies are stored chronologically in file sheets. They are in a great enough number from a long enough span of time that I just can't remember all the whats and whens. On several occasions the database has allowed me to quickly locate the right images when I get a call requesting certain subject material and they want it yesterday. I used AskSam, a free-form database program, but any database program allowing you to create an entry form customized to your needs will work.

  9. #19
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Haug
    In my case the time and effort expended have been worth it. My transparencies are stored chronologically in file sheets.
    I do something similar, but I store my my images not only chronologically, but by location. So, HI1000 would be image #1000 in Hawaii, AU1000 would be image #1000 in Australia. The first two letters being a country or state code. The numbers themselves are meaningless. Eventually, I may put them into a database by location and keyword, but who knows.... I have a pretty good memory for locations, which is probably why I am a color landscape photographer.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  10. #20

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    Robert,
    I've prided myself on good memory of what photos I've taken, but as the images have accumulated over the years I find I no longer have total recall.
    I use to have a subject-oriented code for each image but there were many that would logically fit under more than one of my categories. When I created the database I first re-named all images with a chronological code. A letter for the year, followed by numbers indicating the roll of film and exposure number, then a letter indicating the orientation. For example, A75-10h means taken in 1984, 75th roll of film (numbered sequentially as they are started), 10th exposure on that roll, horizontal orientation. This is the coding for 35mm slides. 4x5 transparencies have a 45 before the letter.

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