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  1. #61
    blaze-on's Avatar
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    I read the article before I read this thread (other than the initial post), which I gathered was about Lenswork. I did so on purpose so I would not be prejudiced.

    The article was well written, made excellent points and in no way did Brooks advocate we should all sell our prints for $20.00.

    The article, as I perceived, was for us to formulate our personal market evaluation, and structure our price point to that. Be realistic. If you have the name, credits, proven sales record and have been getting a certain price point-great. Otherwise, formulate a reasonable price structure that perhaps cuts through the "fine art" dogma and allow ourselves a realistic expectation of revenue based on possible sales (qty) and production cost factor.

    That could be $50.00 for one person and $300 for someone else. Only you/I can determine that.

    I always admired Brooks work, and wished I had bought some of the previous LW editions. I do however think regardless of output methods, $20.00 is just too low..it could possibly prejudice a percentage of the market due to his visibility, inkjet or not. Then again, if I could sell 1000 for $20 I honestly wouldn't care what others thought. Then they'd be $30 the next year...then $40..then...

    It's all about marketing.
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    Harrumph.
    Good point

    Remember, I did say it was going to be a gross over simplification. I was trying to explain my take on how prices shot up so fast, so that in todays gallery scene a newcomer can charge over $3,000.00 for a print.

    I was just starting out in photography when Ansel retired, but if my memory is correct (good thing my Wife isn't here to read that and laugh her head off!), it was after Ansel retired that the prices of photographs started to escalate. When people saw the profit potential in fine art photographs, some got into the game for the money, not because they love photographs. Unfortunately, many buyers need their hand held through the process and require the Stamp of Approval a gallery provides. Sitting ducks for the unscrupulous.

    Murray
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    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  3. #63
    nze
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    Hi all

    I also sell my work at low price. because I feel closer to this philosophy than selling at higher price. This allow me to keep my own business and to met people who are interesting in fine art but don't have the money for buying big names.

    But my own reflexion about pricing is that all of us known that the price of an art peice as nothing todo with quality and so on. A poor thing can be sold thousands , I remember a man who sold 5x7 inch inkjet print made on an epson 800 @ 150DPi @ 700$ each. he don't sell any as the rint was so poor but the gallery who show the work was proud to hang it on the wall at this price.

    I think that art market is like any market and limiting the edition to raise the price as nothing to deal with art
    Chris Nze
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  4. #64
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaze-on
    Then again, if I could sell 1000 for $20 I honestly wouldn't care what others thought. Then they'd be $30 the next year...then $40..then...

    It's all about marketing.
    Not me, a 1000 prints, no matter how you do them at $20 each is just to damn much work, whew, I do like to eat with my family and have time to take pictures and if I had to worry about the quality control on 1000 prints that I am only getting $20 each for, then......no thank you! Yikes

    Dave

  5. #65

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    I hope Kenna gets with the program. He could obviously sell a boat load of 8x10 gelatin sliver prints at $20 a pop. I'll take a couple of $20 Kenna's, a Sexton and I could even go for a couple of Barnbaum's at that price. Paula Chamlee might even let go of a few of those 8x10 contact prints for $20.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  6. #66
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    I suggest everyone look at the current PDN which profiles the $1 stock industry.

    $1 x 3000 uses > $200 * 10 prints

    still, one is hard pressed to pay $40,000 for a small almost anonymous Irving Penn print. Pretty, but

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
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  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    Not me, a 1000 prints, no matter how you do them at $20 each is just to damn much work, whew, I do like to eat with my family and have time to take pictures and if I had to worry about the quality control on 1000 prints that I am only getting $20 each for, then......no thank you! Yikes

    Dave
    Come on Dave you know better then that. All you have to do is push the button and let Mr. Epson do the rest.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  8. #68
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    If Jensen wants to sell his prints for $20, that's his business, for whatever purpose he has. Trying to say all others are overpricing their work is absurd. He just happens to have a pulpit to speak from that the rest of us don't have. I can get $50 for mine and I'm unknown. Christian and Jorge can get double that and more. And there are Westons bringing over $800,000 at auction. EW probably got $10 for it in 1930. That's still more than Jensen's $20 today. You get whatever the market will bring. Simple, basic economics.

    And "NO" I won't sell any of mine below $50 for my own good reasons.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
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  9. #69
    roteague's Avatar
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    I don't think we should forget that often the gallery system keeps the prices of prints higher than they could be. I believe that Brooks has also written extensively about this, some fairly insightful remarks if I remember.
    Robert M. Teague
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  10. #70

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    At the risk of provoking more expressions of horror ( 8-) ), I think you will find that Brooks is selling unmatted prints. Adding a decent mount and mat adds considerably to the materials cost and time, even if you do it yourself. A lot of people will not do their own framing, even if you mat the work. That's why framers do a good business.

    Now, if one goes to the trouble of producing a print with the _intention_ that it out-lasts the life of the photographer or purchaser, then perhaps it is unwise to rely on the purchaser having a good framing job done. But an inexpensive print is going to wind up in an inexpensive (though tasteful, one hopes!) frame from a chain store.

    So tailoring the materials and production to the price you charge *and* the probable use by the class of buyer makes sense. I'd like to be selling to the carriage trade (or at least the Mercedes end of the market rather than the Hyundai), but if someone will give me money for my art, I'll let them.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.



 

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