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  1. #1
    Daniel Lawton's Avatar
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    Which glass for frames?

    Hi everyone. I've been framing a lot of my prints lately and giving them to various family members as gifts. I currently use the Nielsen aluminum frames from Light-Impressions because I like the look and they are resonably priced. I have been getting the glass from some local framing shops and art supply stores without giving them any specific requirements (just regular glass.) The thing that it really annoys me when reflections require the viewer to stand in a certain postion in order to see the print without any distractions. Do most of you use standard glass or is there a reasonably priced anti-glare glass that you can recommend? I'd prefer to use glass and not Plexi-glass since I'm not too keen on the fragile and scratch prone nature of Plexi. Thanks.
    Dan
    Last edited by Daniel Lawton; 01-25-2006 at 05:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Daniel,

    I can get anti reflective(anti glare) glass, if required, I always use a anti glare glass on my prints, and I don't like plexi at all.

    Dave

  3. #3
    KenM's Avatar
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    Why for you not like plex, Dave? I'm starting to use it for larger prints, since glass is just so darn heavy. I'm a bit worried about scratches, but I understand there's this stuff that's called Acrylite, or something like that, that has an anti-scratch coating on it that reduces the changes of scratches....no idea how well it works.
    Cheers!

    -klm.

  4. #4
    Helen B's Avatar
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    I also use only anti-reflective glass (different from non-glare): Tru-Vue Museum. I was thinking of switching to the acrylic version in future (Optium Museum), but that costs significantly more than the already expensive glass.

    The surface of anti-reflective glass is not as tough as plain glass: the anti-reflective coating is comparatively soft and it requires care when cleaning. Non-glare glass is tougher and cheaper - because it is just a surface texture, not a surface coating. There is also non-glare acrylic - which also has a surface texture. However, non-glare glass or acrylic does not cut down on total reflection at all, it only makes it more diffuse instead of specular. The price is reduced apparent D-max and reduced definition. I don't like it. (Example of non-glare glass: Tru-Vue Conservation Reflection Control)

    Anti-reflective glass does reduce reflections, in the same way that lens coating reduces reflections. The remaining reflections are specular, and are colour-tinted, just like a coated lens. Despite the drawbacks and the price, I think that the improved appearance of the print is worth it, and reflects (no pun intended) the trouble we go to to get the print just right. Anyway, my prints need all the help they can get.

    There is indeed an abrasion resistant version of Acrylite. Just to avoid confusion with anti-reflective materials, it is called AR.

    Best,
    Helen
    Last edited by Helen B; 01-25-2006 at 07:47 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added non-glare glass example

  5. #5
    Daniel Lawton's Avatar
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    Thanks for the clarification Helen. I meant to say anti-reflective glass since (as you mention) anti glare can alter the appearance of the print itself which is something I don't want to do. I suspect that in a gallery setting with perfect and well postioned lighting standard glass would look fine, but in a typical household environment with harsh lights in various locations I find the reflections are tough to overcome.

  6. #6
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Daniel,

    I agree with that, though even in a gallery setting there is an improvement, especially if the viewer is wearing light or colourful clothes. I don't have that problem too badly, wearing standard NYC uniform black.

    By the way, I get my Museum glass from Rosen Paramount at 45 E 20th (between Broadway and Park Ave South): 212 532 0820

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #7
    KenM's Avatar
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    Hmmm, I had posted more info on the plex I mentioned, but it didn't show up....guess I forgot to click

    The brand is called Acrylite AR OP-3, and it's quite expensive. $30 US for a 16x20 sheet. The non-coated version, Acrylite OP-3, is 2/3 the price.
    Cheers!

    -klm.

  8. #8
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    I also use only anti-reflective glass (different from non-glare): Tru-Vue Museum.
    I use the same glass you do, it works great.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #9

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    Acrylite AR op-3 is what i use. It's anti UV and abrasion resistant. Most galleries prefer plexi types over real glass because real glass can shatter and destroy the art.

  10. #10
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenM
    Why for you not like plex, Dave? I'm starting to use it for larger prints, since glass is just so darn heavy. I'm a bit worried about scratches, but I understand there's this stuff that's called Acrylite, or something like that, that has an anti-scratch coating on it that reduces the changes of scratches....no idea how well it works.
    Hi Ken,

    It is just a personal preferance, not saying anything bad or good...the galleries I am in still prefer the glass, but I do know that around the country things are different in different locations.

    I have both available to me, so if they change, I guess I will change.

    Dave



 

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