Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,693   Posts: 1,482,471   Online: 960
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,317
    Images
    140

    Is there a standard webpage size?

    I'm using dreamweaver to build my site and i've been told by some that they cannot see the entire index page without scrolling left to right. I've made it on my 20" widescreen so it works fine for me. It's got me thinking: what's the standard size page if there is one that would be best for the vast array of monitor sizes out there?

    ie 1248 x 878

    vinny
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Well many eons ago, (about 5 years) we used to do them at 640 x 480, My wife currently runs our web business with over 400 websites to her credit as of this last week, and she still optimizes every single one at 800 x 600 and never has anyone complain they have to scroll, we as photographers work as higher resolutions than the mass majority of the normal web surfers hence the higher optimized size, but I would recommend either 800 x 600 or 1024 x 768 and you will not have to many problems with anybody seeing your website correctly.

    Dave

  3. #3
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    That is way too wide. I would suggest designing your page for 1024x768 - make the page no larger than 1020 pixels (4 pixels for the border, is what IE likes).
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  4. #4
    Gordon Coale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    45
    I optimize all my sites for 800x600. There are too many people still using that setting.

  5. #5
    juan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    St. Simons Island, Georgia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,635
    Images
    4
    My company had it's website redesigned and the designer made it 1024x68. The boss looked at it and had a hissy fit. She, of course, insists on keeping her screen resolution at 800x600.

    There are still a lot of folks who use 800x600 (aging eyes) so the general recommendation is to use that size.
    juan

  6. #6
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,237
    There are ways to make your web page width dynamic so that it looks good on a wide variety of screen resolutions. I usually view APUG on a monitor set to 1600 x 1200, but it also looks fine at 800 x 600 with no horizontal scrolling because APUG uses CSS to scale dynamically to the viewer's screen size. I manage a small web site using CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) that scales appropriately to the monitor being used across a broad range of resolutions, and is fully usable with a text only terminal browser.

    This isn't the place to go into detail on the methods, but look at www.csszengarden.com and click on the various style choices to see what can be done with layout and design using CSS that scales properly. The content on the home page for that site doesn't change, but the layout and "look" varies radically depending on the style sheet used to format the content. Try it on different resolution screens to see how it scales.

    I don't like pages that are locked into a single resolution, as they look good only at that setting, and progressively worse as the viewer gets further away from a locked in default setting. I often run across pages that have a fixed width and dark left border. The border repeats at somewhere between halfway and three-quarters of the way across my screen, obscuring text content. I consider that poor design.

    Any recent version of Dreamweaver will do CSS, and a good Dreamweaver book will give you the basics on it, so you should be good there. You can also find free CSS templates on the web (search with google) that you can modify for you own purposes. With CSS, if you ever want to change the look and layout of the page, all you do is change the style sheet (in essence the "layout"), not the page content. You can even give viewers a choice of style sheets, just as they do at zengarden.

    Lee

  7. #7
    billschwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Meeshagin
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,746
    Images
    50
    HEy WildBill,

    I have to be one more vote for the 800 pixel width. All my sites are designed this way. Unlike when using CSS, you can still control the final look and layout of your design no matter which resolution your viewers are using. With dynamic sizing, things change from screen to screen.

    Best of luck,

    Bill

  8. #8
    darr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    182
    I use global stats for screen resolution and design for that:

    http://www.thecounter.com/stats/2006/May/res.php
    darr almeda
    Recent Work

  9. #9
    rbarker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,222
    Images
    2
    Has anyone mentioned 800x600? (lol)

    Personally, I think the best approach is to consider the preferences and likely screen sizes of the primary target audience of the site. If the target audience is strictly graphics pros, 1024x768 is probably reasonable. For "consumers", however, assuming a smaller monitor and 800x600 is probably better. Plus, not everyone views a page at full-screen size. For "casual browsing" my browser width is usually set at about 2/3 screen width, for example.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  10. #10
    frugal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Halifax, NS, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    150
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by billschwab
    I have to be one more vote for the 800 pixel width. All my sites are designed this way. Unlike when using CSS, you can still control the final look and layout of your design no matter which resolution your viewers are using. With dynamic sizing, things change from screen to screen.
    Personally, I find it really annoying when I go to a site and find it forced to a specific size.

    I happen to have a widescreen monitor so I have a pretty wide browser window (not the full width) so it really doesn't make use of my screen real estate. But, there are other reasons as well. For instance, designing around a fixed width also means you're probably using fixed font sizes which can really impact the usability of your site for visually impaired people or for those running at a high resolution (I find 12pt looks too small at my screen resolution).

    Usually this mentality of having absolute control over the web page comes from people with a background in paper graphic design. The fundamental difference is that HTML is supposed to leave the final rendering of the document up to the user's browser. Sadly, that original intent was diluted severely and a lot of design elements crept in. Fortunately, CSS has allowed things to get back closer to the original intent where HTML just describes the structure of the document.

    However, I still think that when designing for the web that it's important to recognise that viewers will be using a wide variety of browsers and will be viewing your site in a number of sizes. Expecting all of them to conform to one specific viewing standard really goes against the whole intent of the web. I think it makes far more sense to accept that using a fixed size layout works against the media you're working in, not to mention the host of problems it can create with differing levels of CSS support, and instead focus on the content and then use a style that can work in as many viewing environments as possible.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin