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  1. #11
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darr
    I have used the Valiani ASTRA 120 for a few years and appreciate it every time I use it.
    That's an impressive matt cutter Darr. Reminds me of a Fletcher but less expensive. I've never heard of this brand before.
    Don Bryant

  2. #12
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I almost never compose to a standard aspect ratio so even if I don't particularly enjoy it, I am doomed to cut my own mats or pay someone else to do it.
    I'm in the same boat. It does make matting and framing for a show much more tedious.
    Don Bryant

  3. #13
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    That's an impressive matt cutter Darr. Reminds me of a Fletcher but less expensive. I've never heard of this brand before.
    Doh! I guess if I had looked closer I would have noticed that it is a Fletcher. But that is a good price. In the past I've seen Fletchers go for about $1400.

    I guess that's why I own a Logan!
    Don Bryant

  4. #14
    Andy K's Avatar
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    My bowel hates me and saves things like that until I am locked in the darkroom.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  5. #15
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    I cut my own mats and do my own framing because I choose to. One of the things that attracts me most to photography is being able to be in control of the entire process from composition and exposure to development to printing to preparation for display. If an image is successful and finds its way into an exhibit or someone's collection, it is because I have used all of the skills that I have to their utmost ability. For me, that is satisfaction. I also find matting and framing very cathartic. I framed 2 pieces yesterday and realized afterward that I had not thought about my problems at work the entire time.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  6. #16
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I found a good deal on a high-end Logan cutter on Ebay- it was a retailer looking to move some stock ( I guess to increase his volume and get a better discount from Logan ). It paid for itself on my first show - I had 12 prints to mat ( frame OD 20x24 ). Had I had to farm that job out, it would have cost me well over $1000 for the framing alone. I spent about that much, including buying the mat cutter, but I had enough left-over materials that I could mat a second show the same size without spending another dollar. The Logan cutter I have will even cut 8-ply mats, although it is not perfect (it IS perfect when cutting 4-ply).

  7. #17
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FirePhoto
    I cut my own mats and do my own framing because I choose to. One of the things that attracts me most to photography is being able to be in control of the entire process from composition and exposure to development to printing to preparation for display. If an image is successful and finds its way into an exhibit or someone's collection, it is because I have used all of the skills that I have to their utmost ability. For me, that is satisfaction. I also find matting and framing very cathartic. I framed 2 pieces yesterday and realized afterward that I had not thought about my problems at work the entire time.
    I'm with FirePhoto. Also, to sell dry mounted and matted 11x14 B&W photos in 16x20 aluminum frames for $40 in my rural market requires work. I'd rather work on my own mats and frames than work even harder so I can pay someone else to do the job. A Logan 2000 hand cutter and a home-made guide suffice. Even a Dexter can produce good mats: that's all I used for 20 years. Standardizing on one or two sizes of window mats is efficient. If a shot won't look good in the mat, I don't print it. After all, editing has to start somewhere. In the good old days when Kodachrome was king, I never took vertical shots for slide shows to maintain a smooth presentation.

    For those content to use one or two sizes of window mats, a jig to mark the back of the mat for cutting and another jig to position the print for dry mounting saves time.

  8. #18
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Longridge Duo Plus - Even a thumb-fingered muppet like me can do a good job with one of those!
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  9. #19
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    I'm seeing several folks talk about cutting mats with custom windows due to irregular framing/composition (I'm in that boat, too). But I feel like there are some in this thread that imply they also cut frames and glass, too? Is that correct?

    I don't mind cutting mats (and I'm still using the straight-edge/hand cutter torture system), but do you guys really cut your own frames and glass, too?

    allan

  10. #20
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    I had a home based framing business (the only local option at the time) do mine once. She even showed me the certificate on the wall she got for taking a dry mounting course.

    From the magled pieces of crap I got back, I'm pretty sure she cut the dry mount tissue to size(ish) then trimmed the print to size(ish), then put them into the press without tacking them. Oh, and all the corners of the windows in the overmats were over cut too. I've been doing it myself ever since.

    I use plexi-glass because I don't like the green tint of regular framing glass...anybody know a way to work with that stuff without getting completely frustrated and frazzled fighting static and dust?

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

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