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  1. #21

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    Are you talking Saturday night?

  2. #22
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiyen
    I'm seeing several folks talk about cutting mats with custom windows due to irregular framing/composition (I'm in that boat, too). But I feel like there are some in this thread that imply they also cut frames and glass, too? Is that correct?

    I don't mind cutting mats (and I'm still using the straight-edge/hand cutter torture system), but do you guys really cut your own frames and glass, too?

    allan
    I buy my frames pre-cut but not assembled, and get the glass cut elsewhere also. I now prefer Plexi over glass unless the size of the piece is small, because of the risk of getting cut on un-polished edges. If I ever get around to getting a good table saw, then I'll think about cutting my own frames too, but I'm a bit short on storage space for the moment.

  3. #23
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiyen
    I'm seeing several folks talk about cutting mats with custom windows due to irregular framing/composition (I'm in that boat, too). But I feel like there are some in this thread that imply they also cut frames and glass, too? Is that correct?

    I don't mind cutting mats (and I'm still using the straight-edge/hand cutter torture system), but do you guys really cut your own frames and glass, too?

    allan
    I have my frames cut and assembled by a frame shop. For the odd sizes I have been cutting my own glass, but if I could find a cost effective way to get that done, I would. For some people it is easy, for me, its frustrating.

  4. #24
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Still using the venerable Dexter mat cutter, a T-square, and a C-clamp. Eventually I'll get something easier to use, but the key to the old system is to change blades frequently.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #25

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    I use a Logan cutter 301S, as simple as you can get ($109 at www.lightimpressionsdirect.com ) The quality is in the craftsmanship, not the cost of the device, and although more expensive models provide conveniences and production advantages, my results are as good as any professional work I've seen. I do the squaring and measuring manually too. And Logan provides good phone (yes, you can get someone to talk to you if you have trouble) support.
    I also use Plexiglass, convinced by a friend of mine who owns a framing service. It's lighter, won't break, and if you have a circular saw, you can cut it yourself (although I just buy mine precut-I emphasize the need for accuracy).
    To the issue of static (and there is plenty of it when the backing comes off) - I use a product called "Kleenmaster Brilliantize" (I buy small pump bottles of it from the place where I get the plexi). When the matte is cut and hinged, print mounted, frame assembled - as far as I can go without the plexi - I take the backing off the plexi, and go over both sides with this stuff and a soft cotton T-shirt. It removes the static and polishes the plexi - you can feel the difference in the surface. Then I position the plexi standing on one edge along side the print, dust with compressed canned air, and lower the plexi. Once and a while I have to lift a corner and hit something with air.
    It took awhile to develop the method (ditto the relaxation bit - like "Ashes Work" in classical mythology) but I can't imagine paying anyone.

  6. #26
    Curt's Avatar
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    David your setup is right and changing the blades definitely makes the difference. I have cut glass and ordered metal frames and assembled them myself with great success. I just thought that every thirty years or so a person should look at the alternatives. Lot of great ideas here on this. Thanks.

    Curt

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    "... Still using the venerable Dexter mat cutter, a T-square, and a C-clamp..."
    Same here. And an Olfa cutting mat. Yes, changing blades is a must. I usually use the metal frames and get pre-cut glass.

    Years ago I was given two cartons of mat board -- a carton of black and one of an off-white). But once that supply runs out I'm gonna start using the pre-cut mats.

  8. #28
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    I'm interested in this Logan cutter 301-S. I have received the odd Mat which was slightly overcut at the corners by a "professional" framer. Would this cutter prevent this? I'm a total novice and would prefer something idiot proof.

  9. #29
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Holliday
    I'm interested in this Logan cutter 301-S. I have received the odd Mat which was slightly overcut at the corners by a "professional" framer. Would this cutter prevent this? I'm a total novice and would prefer something idiot proof.
    Overcut corners can be avoided with any cutter if one is careful.

  10. #30
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    Check this out: http://www.dickblick.com/zz171/15/ Logan 301-S at Dick Blick Art Supplies for $75.99.

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

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