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  1. #1
    PeterDendrinos's Avatar
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    Tent for art shows

    I am looking for a quality “tent” to use at art fairs around the state and beyond. I see that EZ-UP is a popular one at many of the shows I have been to. The problem seems to be that I keep hearing that they aren’t very strong, or durable. I have looked at one tent system from Italy made by Mastertent. It’s more expensive but the claims are that it’s built better.

    Any thoughts on the subject?

    I am planning on a 10 x 10 with 3 walls. Most likely white in color.

    Thanks
    Pete
    "…Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action."

    Frank Tibolt

    WWW.DENDRINOS FINE ART.COM

  2. #2
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    I bought a tent at Target for about $30 last year, as I've only done two such shows. I didn't want to get the "Easy-up" because I'm not that committed to doing these fairs.

    So I can't really comment on how good those tents are, but, FWIW, a lot of folks had gallon water jugs filled with sand that were tied to the legs of the tents/displays to keep the wind from taking everything with it!! No matter what tent you get, that may be a good idea!

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    PeterDendrinos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Revy
    I bought a tent at Target for about $30 last year, as I've only done two such shows. I didn't want to get the "Easy-up" because I'm not that committed to doing these fairs.

    So I can't really comment on how good those tents are, but, FWIW, a lot of folks had gallon water jugs filled with sand that were tied to the legs of the tents/displays to keep the wind from taking everything with it!! No matter what tent you get, that may be a good idea!

    Good luck.
    I have heard this over and over. Weight it down. I'll do that. Thanks
    "…Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action."

    Frank Tibolt

    WWW.DENDRINOS FINE ART.COM

  4. #4
    blaze-on's Avatar
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    Jerry's has one that stands ten feet high and comes with side walls, with clear plastic windows.
    Somewhere around $200-$250 all told. Supposed to be sturdy..A friend got one but I haven't seen it set up yet.

    http://www.jerrysartarama.com/art-su...es/online/4747
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterDendrinos
    I am looking for a quality “tent” to use at art fairs around the state and beyond.
    For the first year of doing shows (with a tent) I would recommend a small investment of an EZ UP. Before investing in a nice tent, I would wait until you have a good taste of outdoor show experience and confidence in doing a lot of shows in the future.


    To answer your question:
    The Flourish Company
    http://www.flourish.com/


    These guys are good ol boys from Arkansas that have been in the business for awhile. I invested about $2500 on a Trimline Canopy and it was very worth it. They have kits that start around $800.
    When one is doing outdoor shows, you sometimes do not have the option of electricity to light your work. All Trimlines have a soft sky light to help light the interior and artwork. Since all Trimlines have domes with skylights, they have a very open feel within the interior. They are very durable and made for set up and tear down at art shows. They are expensive, but money well spent.

    Shane Knight
    western horses

  6. #6
    PeterDendrinos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Knight
    For the first year of doing shows (with a tent) I would recommend a small investment of an EZ UP. Before investing in a nice tent, I would wait until you have a good taste of outdoor show experience and confidence in doing a lot of shows in the future.


    To answer your question:
    The Flourish Company
    http://www.flourish.com/


    These guys are good ol boys from Arkansas that have been in the business for awhile. I invested about $2500 on a Trimline Canopy and it was very worth it. They have kits that start around $800.
    When one is doing outdoor shows, you sometimes do not have the option of electricity to light your work. All Trimlines have a soft sky light to help light the interior and artwork. Since all Trimlines have domes with skylights, they have a very open feel within the interior. They are very durable and made for set up and tear down at art shows. They are expensive, but money well spent.

    Shane Knight
    western horses
    Thank you, i'll take a look
    "…Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action."

    Frank Tibolt

    WWW.DENDRINOS FINE ART.COM

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Revy
    a lot of folks had gallon water jugs filled with sand that were tied to the legs of the tents
    Good advice.

    A weighted down tent is a must!!

    I have seen many tents pick up and disappear during unexpected high winds. I use custom wood cabinets within my display that double as the weights to hold the tent down safely. I would recommend 3" to 4" PVC piping with fittings filled with concrete. While the concrete is drying, drill a pilot hole on one end and screw in an "eye" hook. Take a little rope and hang on each corner until they are almost touching the ground. Place some nice clothe around and they seem to blend in with the display nicely.

    Good Luck!

    Shane Knight
    www.shaneknight.com
    western photography

  8. #8

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    I'm doing the same kind of researchright now Pete, this sight seems to be geared to filling up tour space http://www.propanels.com/

    Mike
    'To the complaint, 'There are no people in these photographs,' I respond, 'There are always two people: the photographer and the viewer.'

    Ansel Adams

  9. #9
    PeterDendrinos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike A
    I'm doing the same kind of researchright now Pete, this sight seems to be geared to filling up tour space http://www.propanels.com/

    Mike
    thanks for the info mike

    Pete
    "…Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action."

    Frank Tibolt

    WWW.DENDRINOS FINE ART.COM

  10. #10

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    Check out dick blick. I have never used them but have thought about buying one from them.

    http://www.dickblick.com/zz529/33/
    http://www.dickblick.com/zz528/15/
    http://www.dickblick.com/zz516/19/

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