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  1. #31
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I don't like overcuts, but I've noticed that at some shows I've seen at places like the Art Institute of Chicago, almost every cut on every window is overcut. It strikes me as sloppy and inept (if you're cutting a whole show's worth of mats, you've got plenty to practice on, and it's not that much harder to get it right), and I wouldn't do it myself, but at the same time, maybe we shouldn't be too hung up about it.

    One fashion that I think is fading is absolute print flatness. No one would dare drymount an unmounted vintage print--strictly corner mounting for anything of historical value. Increasingly new prints in photography galleries in New York are hinge mounted. They can be pretty flat, and in good lighting the wrinkles aren't a distraction, but at the same time, they'll never be as flat as a drymounted print.

    On the other hand, there is a trend for large prints to mount on aluminum or for glossy color work to face mount on acrylic or plexiglass.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  2. #32
    reellis67's Avatar
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    The overcuts were more obvious than many that I have seen, and certainly more noticable that the mats the other photographer was using. I get most of my mats pre-cut (since I mainly print in standard sizes) so I can't really complain about it too much other than to say that these could be seen from 3 feet away. I think that if the print quality were higher the overcuts would have been a minor isssue.

    The biggest issues I had was the, er, item on the face of the one print and the other print which showed poor processing technique (large bubbles) clearly visible in the sky area. I felt the muddy tones were an issue, but my wife thought it possible that the photographer was trying to print in a very low contrast way.

    - Randy

  3. #33
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Hi David,

    The reason for and the preference by Museums, Galleries, Frame Shops for archival (corners, t-hinging, etc; I generally t-hinge) preparations is that the image mounting is reversible and repairable. This is not as easy or in many instances not possible with cold and hot/warm mounting methods. As you have said the images prepared as an archival mount are not as flat. However, they can be prepared reasonably flat and when lit properly the roll or wave is not as noticeable. High gloss papers (which I use) will have more reflection and the roll or wave may be more evident than a mat finish.

    Also, be aware, that many Galleries, Museums, Frame Shops are of the opinion that by using non archival mounting methods, the photo is devalued compared to those prepared by an archival mounting method.

    Rich
    Last edited by naturephoto1; 11-10-2006 at 12:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  4. #34
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Yes, I'm aware of those considerations, and generally I agree with them. I usually hinge mount myself. I've been drymounting my albumen prints, though, until I can perfect my starch mounting technique.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #35

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    As long as the marks on the print are intentional and add to the concept of the artwork, it's okay. If that boogie was supposed to be attached to that EXACT part of the print, and those corners of the mat were supposed to look like they were cut with a chainsaw...that is okay. If they are mistakes and lack of skill by the artist, that is not acceptable.

    However, craft is nothing more than a skill that must be learned. Therefore, there is no excuse to not take the time and learn how to create a perfect print.

    Personally, I do not show nor sell prints that are in anyway marked, poorly crafted or not presented in a clean manor. All my prints are as humanly flawless as possible.

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