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  1. #1
    Robert Brummitt's Avatar
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    Plexi or glass? Non glare or standard?

    A photographer friend of mine is setting up a show in town and called me concerning using Glass or Plexi for his prints and should he use standard glass or non glare? His prints are 20x30 then framed.
    I explained to him I use plexi because of the weight and possible danger of a framed print falling and the glass cutting a print. I had this happen to me during the '89 SF earthquake. I had a signed Ansel Adams poster fall and the glass just shredded that paper like a cat to a katnip mouse.
    I tried non glare glass and didn't care how it lowered the contrast of the prints behind it. So, I use standard plex.
    Anyways, I told my friend I would put the question to the Apug community and share their input. So tell me oh wise ones. How do you frame your work. Glass or Plexi? Non glare or standard?
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit"
    Aristotle

  2. #2
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Glass usually, sometimes acrylic ('plexi' as you say); but always anti-reflective and never non-glare. That's awful.

    I use Tru-Vue Museum (glass) and Optium Museum (acrylic). The choice between them is more to do with how they will be transported.

    Best,
    Helen

  3. #3
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    I use non-glare plexi for work I have framed. I use it for the weight, the ability to easily score and break it to size and it's sturdyness. If a print isn't very well lit I find the glare from staight plexi extremely distracting. I've also found the loss of contrast produced by the non-glare surface to be quite minimal, though my prints are very contrasty to start with. Of course the farther the nonglare plexi is from the survace of the print the worse the loss, though a 4ply over mat is thin enough to avoid it. Shawn

  4. #4
    eddym's Avatar
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    Plexi, but not non-glare.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I got non-glare acrylic once, and this was a mistake. The dull finish reduces print contrast. I still need to replace that one.

    There are glasses like Denglas, which have an anti-reflective coating (as is used on lenses)--very expensive, but very nice.

    UV protection is particularly important for color prints.

    For small prints, I usually use glass, but for larger prints UV-blocking acrylic.

    Museums like acrylic, because it's lighter in weight and less likely to break and damage the art.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6

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    I just use Standard aluminium frames that come with Glass, I think plexi wil scratch to fast.

  7. #7
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Get your friend to take small samples of his work and the mat board he's going to use to a frame shop, then lay over them some plexi and glass samples. I find the sickly green cast of regular framing glass to be vile. I use plexi, but to date I haven't gone bigger than 16x20 frames so wobblyness isn't a factor that may come into play at larger sizes.

    Is your friend doing his own framing? Is he a calm, patient man? He'll have to be if he goes with plexi because that stuff'll suck onto its surface any particle of dust within a 1000' radius.

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  8. #8
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Perhaps I should have explained that Tru-Vue Museum and Optium Museum both have anti-reflective coating (very different from non-glare texture). There's a price difference to consider: Museum is expensive, Optium Museum is even more expensive. The glazing is the only thing that gives my pictures any value.

    Oh, by the way, I've also been using face mounting onto acrylic for the past year or so for my Garden Notebooks series. We're experimenting with face mounting onto Optium Museum, but not many places offer this at the moment.

    Best,
    Helen

  9. #9

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    Glass, because I worry about plastic getting scratched. I do all my own matting and framing and have a local glass cutter prepare the glass.

  10. #10
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
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    Make one even with a diamond, and make one without anything. Put them side by side and look. You will not think a long time. And also, photographs are made to be used, touched, handled, not for museums and to be hiden behind a glass. Nice and archival mat, adecvate frame, and a nice photograph is all I need. Your standard might be different.

    By the way, I never saw any "Rembrandt's painting" hiden behind some kind of glass.

    www.Leica-R.com

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