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Thread: Glass

  1. #11

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    As a framer, I can answer a few of the questions here. Glass is used for protection. It has a 47% blockage rate against UV light which is not a lot, but better thatn nothing. It also will deep a certain amount of dirt, grease, etc. off of the image. Regular glass allows about 92% transmission of light through it and regular glass has a slight greenish tint to it unless it is iron free. Acrylic is certainly clearer and has a bit better UV protection, but the downside is it's easier to scratch and does eventually yellow over time. There are some great antireflective glasses that go nearly invisible. Denglas and Image Perfect are two of the trade names. Please note that they are not considered museum glass unless they have about 99% UV blockage. I work with IP glass mainly. It does a great job of eliminating relfection. However, it's tough to handle. Up until recently, you had to clean it with an alcohol based cleaner and the surface is a little softer than regular glass. Then there's the price difference. A case of glass is about $40 where IP will cost at least $300 for the same case. It doesn't come cheap! Now, this is not the same as non glare glass which is more heavily etched to reduce that glare and basically softens the image. Hope this helps. Jim

  2. #12

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    David -

    Paintings are very different from photographs. In fact some need to breathe. There are paintings that are literally hundreds of years old that have not full dried yet. They still give off various vapors. Better to bisperse them than trap them. They are also much hardier. Oil paints and watercolors don't hold a fingerprint smudge the way glossy paper does. Even then you'll notice many paintings behind those velvet ropes.
    Official Photo.net Villain
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  3. #13

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    Pastels and watercolors are nearly always displayed behind glazing. Oil paintings generally have a varnished surface that is much less delicate and so are usually displayed without glass. There are exceptions: I recently saw a number of Francis Bacon paintings which were framed under acrylic (huge pieces of acrylic because they were really big paintings). It was obvious that the canvases were not varnished, an esthetic decision on Bacon's part, and so needed the protection of glazing.

    Photographs do lose a lot when the surface is hidden by glass or acrylic, but the photographic surface is too vulnerable to leave exposed to an audience that isn't knowledgable and trustworthy.


  4. #14

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    I understand that a photographer in the Twin Cities (MN) is marketing prints done by an process which transfers a print emulsion to an embossed surface that is very durable and requires no glass. I am looking for more information on this process for application in my fine art print sales. The process may have some digital component. If anyone knows anything about this process, please respond. Thanks
    reimerron

  5. #15

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    Like you I would rather see the image without interference, but just imagine, you have spent many hours and lots of mula making your gelatin/pt/cyanotype....(fill in what rocks you). YOur work gets to the gallerie/museum/show....and you see all these people touching, licking, putting their greasy nose on the print....
    E-RPM SOFT COM
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  6. #16
    fdi
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    I have information about the pro's and con's of using glass and acrylic for picture framing here: glass vs acrylic
    In this case, I am referring to framing grade acrylic. Acrylic is material type, and names such as Plexiglas and Acrylite are brand names.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  7. #17

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    Use of reg glass is what cause the image to be hard to see. I always use den/museum glass. A lot of museum are now putting everything under plexiglass boxes for protection from environmental concerns. Packing art is not something I would leave to movers. I have sent art all over the world without incident. If you have valuable art have a professional art mover package it, cheap insurance.

  8. #18
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    Works on paper should always be behind glass unless varnished. You might try "GOLDEN Archival Aerosol MSA Varnish w/UVLS" if you want to remove the ridge glass/acrylic barrier from your work. http://www.goldenpaints.com/products/varnish/msa.php

    Eli

    Note: Take a look here for a number of useful links, including how to make paper mounts for photographs, etc.
    Last edited by eli griggs; 08-13-2009 at 12:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    Steve, I posted this for those of us that might not have know about these products/links in the first place. What you do with that information is entirely up to you.

    Personally, as an artist and a photographer, I have been concerned with issues of permanency/light-fastness/archival properties for more than 30 years and it is a continuing issue with new materials and methods of doing things constantly evolving.

    I don't try everything I read about, nor do I jump on just any product that comes to my attention, but I do like to know about various materials and techniques that might have a place in some medium I happen to work in or might in the future. I'm sure that there are others here that feel likewise. It is in that spirit that I posted these links.

    An example might be someone making carbon prints with ink-jet papers whom might have a need for the MSA varnish for works that are displayed without the protection of a glass/acrylic barrier.

    Eli

  10. #20
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    I stopped using any type of glazing for my carbon transfer images. Is it a gamble, maybe, but I can not and will not cover up my work with glazing. My art, my decision.

    Jim

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