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Thread: Glass

  1. #21
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    Works on paper should always be behind glass unless varnished. You might try "GOLDEN Archival Aerosol MSA Varnish w/UVLS" if you want to remove the ridge glass/acrylic barrier from your work. http://www.goldenpaints.com/products/varnish/msa.php

    Eli

    Note: Take a look here for a number of useful links, including how to make paper mounts for photographs, etc.
    Last edited by eli griggs; 08-13-2009 at 01:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eli griggs View Post
    Works on paper should always be behind glass unless varnished. You might try "GOLDEN Archival Aerosol MSA Varnish w/UVLS" if you want to remove the ridge glass/acrylic barrier from your work. http://www.goldenpaints.com/products/varnish/msa.php

    Eli

    Note: Take a look here for a number of useful links, including how to make paper mounts for photographs, etc.
    The first link describes the product and its uses. Protecting chemically based photographs is not listed although ink jet prints are.

    If they are not recommending their own product to protect photographs, I will not volunteer to try it myself. However you are free to try the product, if so please PM me at 50 years and at 100 years.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #23
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    Steve, I posted this for those of us that might not have know about these products/links in the first place. What you do with that information is entirely up to you.

    Personally, as an artist and a photographer, I have been concerned with issues of permanency/light-fastness/archival properties for more than 30 years and it is a continuing issue with new materials and methods of doing things constantly evolving.

    I don't try everything I read about, nor do I jump on just any product that comes to my attention, but I do like to know about various materials and techniques that might have a place in some medium I happen to work in or might in the future. I'm sure that there are others here that feel likewise. It is in that spirit that I posted these links.

    An example might be someone making carbon prints with ink-jet papers whom might have a need for the MSA varnish for works that are displayed without the protection of a glass/acrylic barrier.

    Eli

  4. #24
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    I stopped using any type of glazing for my carbon transfer images. Is it a gamble, maybe, but I can not and will not cover up my work with glazing. My art, my decision.

    Jim

  5. #25

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    Glass is rarely applied in front of oil paintings because of the nature of the beast - canvas is meant to breath and is best left open. Actually, some museums do put glass in front of rare master pieces - The Met kept Van Gogh's 'Starry Night' under glass for protection.

    In the case of photography - glass serves to protect the image and is a traditional framing method. There are other options out there that give you a better presentation.

    Mounting your images to a durable substrate and applying a UV lamination over top is a great look. Many Chelsea galleries are doing this and then framing with a thin floater frame, no glass or plexi. The UV lam allows you to clean the surface of your image while deferring the reflective components that glass and plexi provide.

    L2 Fine Art Mounting and Framing is a reputable custom mounting and framing company that serves the fine art photography market - they do great work at a fair price and a timely turnaround - they also crate and ship all over the world.

    L2mounting.com

    718-947-3400 x426

  6. #26
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbecia@aol.com View Post
    ...Regular glass allows about 92% transmission of light through it and regular glass has a slight greenish tint to it unless it is iron free. Acrylic is certainly clearer and has a bit better UV protection, but the downside is it's easier to scratch and does eventually yellow over time...
    Acrylic (Plexiglass) has roughly the same same light transmittance as glass (92%).

    http://www.rplastics.com/plexiglass-transmittance.html
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #27
    fdi
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    Unfortunately the question of glass vs acrylic is similar to which type of lens - prime or zoom. It depends on what you are doing. I have a decent amount of info about the pro's and con's of glass vs acrylic here:
    Glass vs Acrylic

    Cheers,
    Mark
    Last edited by fdi; 12-11-2009 at 02:14 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fdi View Post
    Unfortunately the question of glass vs acrylic is similar to which type of lens - prime or zoom. It depends on what you are doing. I have a decent amount of info about the pro's and con's of glass vs acrylic here:
    Glass vs Acrylic

    Cheers,
    Mark
    That's what I got:

    You are not authorized to view this page

    The Web server you are attempting to reach has a list of IP addresses that are not allowed to access the Web site, and the IP address of your browsing computer is on this list.
    Please try the following:

    Contact the Web site administrator if you believe you should be able to view this directory or page.
    HTTP Error 403.6 - Forbidden: IP address of the client has been rejected.
    Internet Information Services (IIS)

    Technical Information (for support personnel)

    Go to Microsoft Product Support Services and perform a title search for the words HTTP and 403.
    Open IIS Help, which is accessible in IIS Manager (inetmgr), and search for topics titled About Security, Limiting Access by IP Address, IP Address Access Restrictions, and About Custom Error Messages.


    Do you have a clean link?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #29
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    When visiting Dick Phillips the camera builder I was surprised to see that none of the many framed prints on the walls had glass. He listed all the complaints given by others here and said that this was the way he liked it. I don't argue with a man who has built six hundred of the finest cameras in his basement over the years and whose year's production sold out one year in the first three days of the year. The following year they sold out in the first half day of the year. They were very nice photographs. I would have been very proud if I had shot and printed them that well.

    Perhaps in museums we are putting glass around the wrong object. If people are going to do such terrible things as have been mentioned, perhaps we should put each patron in a glass box with casters so that for an additional fee they can be wheeled about to see the images in frames without glass.

    John Powers

  10. #30
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    I prefer no glass -- but the d**n fly s**t is a PITA.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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